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Author Topic: Navigating Guangzhou...  (Read 621 times)

Calach Pfeffer

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Navigating Guangzhou...
« on: May 25, 2017, 02:20:39 AM »
Next week I have to get myself from place to place in Guangzhou. Specifically, I want to get from Guangzhou East train station to the Oz consulate in Zhujiang New City, and then from there on to Guangzhou South train station.

Is that far in a taxi?
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Escaped Lunatic

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #1 on: May 25, 2017, 02:40:32 AM »
Think subway.  GZ has a system which should get you close to all your target destinations.
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Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #2 on: May 25, 2017, 05:57:56 AM »
I found a GZ subway map...




But I have never subbed way in China.

How does it work?
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Escaped Lunatic

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #3 on: May 25, 2017, 08:09:00 AM »
First, figure out the nearest stop to each of your 3 destinations.  I know there's a stop just across the "Wow there are a lot of people lined up here for Spring Festival" area at one of the train stations (not sure which one that is).  There's another one half a block from the front door of the new US Consulate (ran into the subway station to buy a cold drink out of a vending machine while inlaws were being interviewed for US visas).  Hopefully the Australian Consulate is also convenient to one.  Check the consulate website and see if they are kind enough to include walking directions to/from the nearest station.

The last time I used the subway there, you could go to a machine in the station, touch your destination and it would sell you a token with the right amount of money.  Finding your way around is like any subway -  make sure not to miss your transfer stations and try not to accidentally go the wrong way.
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scotto858

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #4 on: May 27, 2017, 01:13:11 AM »
Sounds like you're pulling into Guangzhou East station -- then you pop on the 3 line down to ZhuJiang New Town.   that is relatively close for a taxi ride (but also seems very convenient for a subway). 

Guangzhou south station is a hike, its at the end of the 2 line. (the end marked: Guangzhou South Station).  Dont be confused by Guangzhou (regular) station (that is going the other direction). 

Get your subway card in a 7-11 or from the service kiosk inside the subway station (next to the turnstiles).

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #5 on: May 29, 2017, 12:28:38 AM »
 agagagagag
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #6 on: May 29, 2017, 09:29:35 AM »
So it looks like GZ East to Zhujiang New Town is a straight shot down the No.3 line. After that, there's various ways to get to GZ South, the most obvious being: Stay on the No.3 and transfer to the No.7 at some place called Hanxi Changlong. I assume transfer is a matter of following signs and climbing stairs, but how's the whole thing paid for?

One card, one-time purchase, daytripper style or new ticket each time?
« Last Edit: May 29, 2017, 10:33:12 AM by Calach Pfeffer »
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #7 on: May 29, 2017, 09:46:25 AM »
https://travelcathay.com/2014/08/05/guangzhou-subway/

So per that link, there's an 一日游 (yi1ri4you2) - one-day travel

Just to clarify: that ticket remains valid for the day, even if you leave the subway station and come back later?
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #8 on: May 29, 2017, 09:48:41 AM »
Per this, no, you can't leave the subway system - once you do, your 24 hour ticket is void?


There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #9 on: May 29, 2017, 12:16:41 PM »
Multicuotin':

The last time I used the subway there, you could go to a machine in the station, touch your destination and it would sell you a token with the right amount of money.

Re that: do the machines allow you to touch other line destinations? Like, if you're going to transfer halfway through?


Get your subway card in a 7-11 or from the service kiosk inside the subway station (next to the turnstiles).

Do those tickets become void once you leave the destination station? Or this 24 hour ticket, can you ride one line, leave the subway system, then come back later (within 24 hours) and still use that same ticket?



Enquiring (and anxious) minds wish to know.




Also, is 8:30am-iih rush hour? I'm guessing yes.
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Escaped Lunatic

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #10 on: May 30, 2017, 01:37:31 AM »
As long as the lines connect, you should be able to select any stop on any line, pay the machine, and collect your token.

It's been a loooooong time, but the last time I used it, the tokens had a time function which activated when you run it through the machine to get into the paid areas of the station.  I assume this was to prevent people from riding around all day on one token.  Not sure how to get all the tokens at once, since fairs will vary.

If you want to take multiple rides and don't want to have to wait at the machine each time, there's some sort of transit card you can buy.  If you are only taking 2-4 rides, it's probably not worth it.  They may have a 1 day pass (or may not).
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Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #11 on: May 30, 2017, 09:01:18 AM »
Oz Consulate would seem to be within longish walking distance of a Metro stop. "Longish" in that it looks doable but I can't be sure how long it'll take. Thus, I shall in the first instance catch a taxi, and probably arrive tremendously early for the friggen ten minute appointment I have to undertake all this travel crap for. I do however have time after that ten minutes is done. The subway it is then. If I never return, tread lightly, my friends, for I could be anywhere but it won't be above ground.
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...

Escaped Lunatic

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #12 on: May 31, 2017, 04:02:32 AM »
From Pigeon Army Command Central
To Rat Army, GZ Division, Subway Brigade

Be advised that target "C" plans to use the GZ subway system soon.  We've deployed aerial recon unites above all entrances along with fully overfed dive bombers above the most likely entrances.  The bombing crews have already been given standard training, as shown in this image.



We request you have your units ready to harass target C at all times when he is below ground.  If your forces could actually gnaw off one of his shoes, we would consider that to be a great victory.
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scotto858

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #13 on: May 31, 2017, 11:46:10 PM »
stop in a 7-11 and buy a metro card (which is also a bus pass).   地铁刷卡  di tie shua ka.    put some chinabucks on it and then use it at the turnstile.  Its the easiest way.

You can also buy this card at the service kiosk next to the turnstiles. but sometimes the attendant is not attendant so you have to find someone to man the post and sell you a card.

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: Navigating Guangzhou...
« Reply #14 on: June 02, 2017, 05:00:01 AM »
What actually happened...

Train

K train to GZ - to the tune of the urine whistle and the buzz snore.

What I want to know, if that curbside training all children get, to urinate on whistled command, if it really works why does it take so long, the whistled command to tinkle now just goes on and on, and, frankly, if it genuinely did work, why, when some old lady starts with the tuneless peep, why doesn't everyone in the street clutch their forks and look for a place to pee too? I think if you hang a child over the gutter (or the hole in the cupboard floor that is the train toilet cabinet) and whistle long enough, eventually it will piss anyway.

And lordy, did ear plugs come in handy. The guy in the next bunk was an accomplished snorer, never quite choking himself, and never stopping, and indeed sometimes issuing a genuine "pretend pig" oink such as a child might make. Though my ears were well and truly blocked, and I did discover you can sleep quite handily with them stuffed in, I still heard him.

Taxi

Anyway... train arrived GZ late and I went for a taxi rather than try my luck on the metro even though the entryway was right there. Taxi ride was 20 yuan and took a few minutes. I arrived an hour ahead of my appointed meeting time, and went looking for breakfast instead.

Feets

The actual appointment in the consulate was an adventure in its own right. I decided what the hell and went in early to get a jump on things. Had to show my passport to get inside. had to use a special magic card to make the elevator open at the right floor. Had to drink some of my water in front of the security people before I could get inside. And when I did meet the counter staff, they started fretting over the passport photos I'd provided: head size too big and overall too dark in the face. Inasmuch as I did have three hours to kill, I said, fine, whatever, I will trot off to the studio you recommend and get some new pics taken. Thus I went walking.

GZ, or at least the part around the consulates has that weird Japanese (I think) foot traffic management system where at intersections you have to wait until the walking light goes green for everyone and you can walk wherever across the intersections, even diagonally. But it does mean a longer wait for the right to walk. So anyway I stomped around a while, found the photo place (and decided I'd also found the path to the metro station because I'd been studying maps before and knew the street names), got a photo taken and then watched as the Photoshop lady went to work. She removed some of the perspiration from my forehead, the hot day's redness from my nose and cheeks, and the tiny spots of incipient stubble left by overnighting on the train with no razor; and she edited out the shadows in the background. All of which, as far as I am aware, is very unsuitable for a passport photo which is supposed not to be digitally altered at all.... but this was the place recommended by the consular staff and Australian Post (one of the recommended ways to get passport photos in Oz) had pooched the originals so whatev. I stomped back. Handed over the photos. Deal done. Time to go home.

Metro

I'm looking at a map now and I see what went wrong. I was on Huacheng Rd (as opposed to Huacheng Ave) expecting to find an intersection with Huaxia Rd and go north to find the B1 entrance to the Zhujiang New City metro station. That would work very well if I were strolling Huali instead. Going north along Huaxi from Huacheng Rd actually takes me away from the metro station, not toward it. Luckily, it was hot and I got to a large roundabout and decided that somehow I'd read the map wrong. i turned around, walked back, and to my surprise happened in short order upon the A1 entrance to the metro.

Once underground, it's basically impossible to get lost. the whole place is as spacious as an airport terminal but there are obvious signs everywhere, in both English and Chinese. I knew I was looking for Line 3, so I just went where the signs pointed. In a large underground hall there were giant box that looked like some combination of a poker machine and an oversized ATM with a TV screen about belly height. These were the ticket machines. I approached one warily.

The ticket machines are halfway intuitive. At first you touch a map, but then you have to touch a line, and no amount of touching the actual lines representing the metro lines would do the trick. (You have to touch the line menu at the bottom). I was able to touch a destination on another line and nominate some combination of something, I can't remember what, but it asked me for money so I decided, Achievement Unlocked, and paid up anyway. For six yuan I received a filthy green token and a unhelpful number of 1 yuan coins in change.

Finding the right platform and the right car was just as easy - follow the signage, and wait - and the car turned up promptly. And good lord, if that's what it's like at 11am on a Thursday, rush hour must be hellish. The car was standing room only, but I didn't have to touch too many people and large numbers of people disembarked at the next station, and again at the station after that. The cars have both announcements and graphical indicators of progress so getting off at the transfer station was a breeze. Likewise, finding the other line was easy. All went well. About the only hiccup was at the Guangzhou South Train Station station. The exit signage there is very unhelpful. No obvious indication of which exit into the train station is best. I picked one and gazed about with everyone else as best I could. Luckily, train stations are sort of obvious anyway: find the security check in line (where you show your ticket and get it stamped and then can go upstairs for the x-rays, the wands, the stepping through the metal detectors, and on to the waiting rooms).

Owing to screwing around with passport photos and getting mildly lost that one time, I arrived with about ten minutes to spare for the train. No lunch for this little traveller. Belly was growling by the time I got "home". Take a packed lunch, kiddies.

Postscript:

Travelling on a  Foreign Expert Certificate: entirely do-able. Both the normal train staff and the high-speed train staff accepted the booklet without question. No need to show my passport anywhere.


Also, I saw my first tattooed lady. Guangzhou, or at least the metro and train stations there, seem to have a lot more tattooed people than anywhere else I've been. This one young woman had a reasonably complete vambrace piece (forearm) and something about the greaves area (lower leg). Attractive young woman, dark and ugly tattoo work. Big splotchy thing, not like something she, seems to me, would have chosen for herself. then again, who knows. She seemed fine walking around with it all on display. Maybe I need to get out more.
There is little in history to support the proposition that China was indeed the centre of the Asian universe commanding deference among less civilised states around its periphery...