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Author Topic: How about just disconnect the Chinese internet...  (Read 4156 times)

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: How about just disconnect the Chinese internet...
« Reply #15 on: May 29, 2015, 10:42:52 AM »
That is kind of an interesting question. How many other countries have the gall? Aside from needing some critical mass of size, substance, and money, you'd also need something really a lot more hardcore than just political will.

I suppose, anyway. But perhaps that's ethnocentrism. China doesn't need that much gall when language alone provides one ready-made, largely inaccessible barrier. (I don't mean the language is hard to learn - I mean it's sufficiently alien that encounters with it, spoken and written, are enough to deter follow ups.) Isolationist Arab states, for instance... well, do they have that barrier? Aren't most Arab countries presently the result of European imperialism, meaning even though they're officially different countries, they share similar writing and or speaking systems? (I know zip about the "Middle East.)

God lord, perhaps I'm juts having culture shock. Is there, after all, any particular reason the English language version of internet culture should prevail other than hegemony?

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Calach Pfeffer

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Re: How about just disconnect the Chinese internet...
« Reply #16 on: May 30, 2015, 12:14:06 AM »
It's a cheap shot I suppose, but these two stories did appear right next to each other in a news feed:

How Comedians Became Public Intellectuals

This week, in a much-anticipated sketch on her Comedy Central show, Amy Schumer staged a trial of Bill Cosby in “the court of public opinion.” Schumer—her character, at any rate—played the role of the defense. “Let’s remind ourselves what’s at stake here,” she argued to the jury. “If convicted, the next time you put on a rerun of The Cosby Show you may wince a little. Might feel a little pang. And none of us deserve that. We don’t deserve to feel that pang.”

Her conclusion? “We deserve to dance like no one’s watching, and watch like no one’s raping.”

Ooof. This is the kind of thing that gets Inside Amy Schumer referred to as “the most feminist show on television,” and her act in general called, in a phrase that reveals as much about her craft as about Schumer herself, “comedy with a message.” But while Schumer’s work is operating at the vanguard of popular comedy, it’s also in line with the work being done by her fellow performers: jokes that tend to treat humor not just as an end in itself, but as a vehicle for making a point. Watch like no one’s raping....



Chinese artist who posted funny image of President Xi Jinping facing five years in prison as authorities crackdown on dissent in the arts

A Shanghai-based artist has been detained for depicting President Xi Jinping pulling a funny face and sporting a large moustache, seemingly the latest episode in Chinese authorities’ crackdown on dissent in the arts...

[image] - if you can't take the clink, don't click the link

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Calach Pfeffer

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Re: How about just disconnect the Chinese internet...
« Reply #17 on: June 11, 2015, 06:06:38 AM »
China’s Slow Internet a Drag on Businesses, European Chamber Says

China’s slow Internet speed and censorship of an ever-growing number of websites are having a negative impact on businesses in the country, according to a new survey by the European Chamber of Commerce in China. And Jörg Wuttke, the chamber’s president, has some advice for those seeking to take up the issue with China’s government.

“Better to talk to them than send an email,” Mr. Wuttke said Wednesday when asked at a news conference whether he had spoken with authorities in Beijing about persistent problems with e-mail blocking and Internet censorship.

57% of European companies in China say the inability to access certain web pages in China is having a negative effect on their business, according to the chamber’s latest survey of 541 European firms.

Aside from restrictions on web access, Internet slowness and instability are also having detrimental effects on businesses, the survey said. 24% of respondents said that connectivity issues had led to lower productivity, and 31% pointed to China’s Internet as making it more difficult to exchange data and documents with their company headquarters, partners and clients.

Mr. Wuttke said that the Chinese government is moving to increase the speed of the Internet, but it isn’t creating access. Beijing understands the business implications, he said, adding that for the world’s second largest economy and the biggest foreign investor, “It is simply not fitting to be five times slower than South Korea.”

Among the survey’s other findings: 58% of respondents say they are optimistic about China’s growth outlook, a drop of 10 percentage points from 2014 and the lowest number since 2011.

China’s rank as an investment destination is also slipping, with 61% citing it as a top or top-three destination — a drop of 10 percentage points 2012.

And as China’s growth continues to slow, 39% of respondents say they plan to cut costs in China this year. A majority of those companies — 61% — say they plan to reduce their headcount.

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Guangzhou Writer

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Re: How about just disconnect the Chinese internet...
« Reply #18 on: June 14, 2015, 07:47:48 AM »
Where does China draw the line of inconvenience? What really stops the various administrations insisting on maximum inconvenience across borders? Why not turn off all outside connections?
I've wondered the same since they're doing almost everything imaginable to reduce communication, like blocking all Google services. I think there is an extreme, fundamental attitude of cultural isolation here (and looking back, I also see that in my home country, USA) and Xi Jinping's "anti-corruption" campaign is also about closing the borders to Chinese who want to take their money and families elsewhere, because it betrays a loss of faith in the government and social system, which possibly, don't know, can not handle large scale foreign influence.

The Chinese system does not include choices for many important areas, such as politics and education, and when people see that other countries with higher living standards have these choices, albeit some of them false or misleading, they can no longer even pretend to believe in the status quo in China, and since they have opportunities to escape it through business, immigration, and education, I think the CPC senses its power base is weakening at high levels.

They want to manage the influence of foreign, but that's very difficult to do, especially with the internet. If they could, yes, they would make it a one-way membrane, but you can't make the internet only one way. It's impossible, and no, they can't shut it off completely, so we get the GFW.
Formerly gzwriter