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Author Topic: Dodgy Job Ad #3  (Read 3513 times)

Raoul F. Duke

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Dodgy Job Ad #3
« on: September 11, 2007, 05:53:22 AM »
Here's the full ad. This job has low pay but doesn't really suck...

We are Chacha college in Zhang jia gang city, which is top 10 cities in china,  and close to suzhou and wuxi ,and now we are looking for a couple to work for us.
RequirementsF
1. Teachers from America, Canada, the UK, Australia, New Zealand, etc. A couple will be prefer
2. Hold a bachelor degree or above,
3. Have a recognized TEFL / TESOL certificate. Teaching experience preferred.
4. With love and devotion to international education, vivid, creative, caring and responsible
5. Good communication skills and pleasant personality; patient, full of RESPONSIBILITY, creativeness and of course ENERGY
6. Working Hours: Monday to Friday
7. studentsf age:18-21
8. start date:asap
Benefits:
1. salary:5500RMB monthly based on around 18 classes per week, and we also will pay extra hour fee.100RMB per hour
2. Three months vacation will be paid as full salary, and you will also have international day, new year ,etc
3. 2,200RMB per year for traveling allowance,
4. 2,200RMB per year for medicine
5. housing: we will provide you Full accommodation with computer with internet
6. return airfare will be reimbursed for one school year contract
7. Working permit and residential permit are provided
How to apply
Please attach the following to your email
+ A clear photo
+ resume
+ copy of degree/diploma
+ copy of TESOL certification or equivalent
+ a copy of your passport!!
+ a contact phone number
+when you could start
Please attach these to your reply letter, along with a contact phone number.
Reply to:
Sum Yung Gai
PH:12345678910
don't_e-mail_me@gmail.com


This job actually has potential, although the pay is on the low side.
The problem is the part in bold italics at the beginning of the ad. Zhangjiagang is NOT a "top ten city". It's not really even a city. It's an obscure little village in southern Jiangsu province. It may not be far from Suzhou or Wuxi, but it's primarily accessible to them only by cramped van during daylight hours. It may not be so bad, as small towns go...but it's assuredly NOT what they're trying to represent it as being.

The lesson: ALWAYS research the town you're considering. Don't just take the word of the employer trying to entice you there. We tend to focus on salary and hours and benefits...but the setting is very important, too.
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

birddog

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Re: Dodgy Job Ad #3
« Reply #1 on: September 11, 2007, 07:29:37 AM »
Thanks, Raoul...

Almost three years ago (January, 2006. I believe) I expressed interest in a teaching postion in Zhang Jia Gang. In the beginning, the representative for the position/school contacted me immediately and enthusiastically. As I posed more and more questions about the position (terms, salary. living quarters, etc.) his replies became incresingly slower.

I asked several Chinese friends who live in various areas of Jiangsu (some not far from Zhang Jia Gang) about Zhang Jia Gang, and all of them consistently advised me not to go there. Their feeling was that the palce is far too remote and unappealing for FTs to dwell on a daily basis. I also remember noticing that the position I had been considering remained open for a very long time -- but I have no idea if the job ad Raoul has posted, and the one I had discussions about in 2006, are the same. Perhaps not.

As Raoul said, the point is, when considering a teaching job, location should be as important as salary and other terms and conditions. Be cautious and inquisitive about EVERYTHING!


 
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