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Author Topic: Tv  (Read 73249 times)

Tree

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Re: Tv
« Reply #90 on: May 25, 2013, 06:02:54 PM »
If you like animation,

Drawn Together
Harvey Birdman
Aqua Teen Hunger Force

Have you seen Archer? By far the best animated series I have ever seen, rivaling Futurama although in a thoroughly different way.
The greatest and most important problems of life are all in a certain sense insoluble. They can never be solved, but only outgrown.
- Jung

Tree

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Re: Tv
« Reply #91 on: May 25, 2013, 06:04:45 PM »
Comedy:
- The IT Crowd
- The Office
- Black Adder
- Absolutely Fabulous

Other:
- Dexter
- The Wire
- Buffy the Vampire Slayer
- Breaking Bad

Try Black Books. It's only 3 seasons long so a quick download, and I think it's on Netflix as well. It's a Graham Linehan production, like IT Crowd, but with Dylan Moran and Bill Bailey.
The greatest and most important problems of life are all in a certain sense insoluble. They can never be solved, but only outgrown.
- Jung

Subtitle

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Re: Tv
« Reply #92 on: May 28, 2013, 03:49:05 PM »
Loved season 1 of Black Books.
Added Longmire, just beginning its second season ... with Starbuck from Battlestar!  ajajajajaj ajajajajaj

Fozzwaldus

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Re: Tv
« Reply #93 on: May 29, 2013, 02:05:52 AM »
Dylan Moran is the greatest Irishman that has ever lived, forget about Joyce, Wilde, Yeats, Jedward. 
两只老外, 两只老外,跑得快,跑得快,
一个是老酒鬼,一个是老色鬼,真奇怪, 真奇怪

Guangzhou Writer

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Re: Tv
« Reply #94 on: May 29, 2013, 09:30:18 AM »
I'm watching a bit of Locked Up Abroad as I like the premise and wanted to see how other countries legal and penal systems work. First two eps are fairly boring about young, stupid kids agreeing to smuggle drugs, "just this once" and getting caught.

Thankfully, I looked for a better episode and found one about an American who got kidnapped in Columbia. Much more interesting as he's intelligent and confronted with a difficult situation.

Li Fu

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Re: Tv
« Reply #95 on: May 31, 2013, 01:53:38 PM »
I brought 4 sets of DVD's with me:
"Yes Minister"
some "Seinfeld" episodes
"The Complete Benny Hill" collection and
"The complete Mr Bean" collection.
At home is the complete "M.A.S.H." and some "McHale's Navy" dvds and the complete "Everyone Loves Raymond" collection.
I also have with me the complete "House" collection, but that is as much for lessons as it is for my own entertainment.
I am sure most of these could be downloaded from Yu Ku or similar bfbfbfbfbf

Subtitle

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Re: Tv
« Reply #96 on: June 01, 2013, 05:12:51 PM »
Yes, I think I must add a "classics" category to the list. But "Everybody .. Raymond"? Really? I view this as misogynistic humor reversed. Yeah, it's kind of funny (sort of), but, no, I won't add it to my "page six list".
It's a hard call. Gilligan's island wouldn't make it, bit McHale's Navy would. Not because of any quality difference, but because of familiarity.
And Benny Hill's various theme songs are what get me through my morning commute. :-)
House though. House is work-a-day, but brilliant.
Meanwhile .. I want more. I want a Trailer Park Boys or a Seven Periods with Mr. Gormsby",  not "What you can do with your mother."
« Last Edit: June 01, 2013, 05:31:43 PM by Subtitle »

Day Dreamer

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Re: Tv
« Reply #97 on: June 02, 2013, 05:42:48 AM »
In the classics category, you must add one of the all time greats, the groundbreaking "All in the Family"

Jean Stapleton, who's roll was the housewife Edith Bunker died on Friday. We lost "Dingbat", stiffled forever
For you to insult me, first I must value your opinion

A-Train

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Re: Tv
« Reply #98 on: June 02, 2013, 05:55:19 AM »
Amen to that.  Funny as hell and spoke for their generation at the same time.  The "Greatest Generation" versus the "Baby Boomers".  I had my choice to watch it on "All In The Family" or watch it in person between my older siblings and my parents.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

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Re: Tv
« Reply #99 on: June 02, 2013, 07:44:55 AM »
"All in the Family" is a good example of very clever programming that took years to unfold. They gave us someone in Archie Bunker we could call a benevolent bigot, a somewhat realistic and familiar figure of ignorance that allowed us to laugh nonstop at the older, unenlightened generation of patriotic and patronizing white guys. Archie was the kind of man who always felt better about himself if there was a black man around to prove Bunker's unspoken and unfounded superiority.

His antagonist was the simplistically idealistic Michael Stivic, who allowed us to laugh at socially progressive ideas that were news to no one who cared about important social issues by the time they were on prime time in the 70's. All the stuff about racism was old hat by the time the show was aired, however where did the show end up going? What new minority group needed special status at that time?

And if you agree with Archie or identify with him regarding certain changing social mores, you're calling yourself an ignorant bigot, so you sort of end up going along with *all* the new ideas that he is against because he's an unenlightened old fart and you're an idealistic and forward thinking person, one who feels automatically superior to both Bunker and also more clever than Meathead, right? Why, just having them around on TV makes one thank their parents for being raised better.

Then is the main reason they made that show just so we could all feel better about ourselves because we're not bigots like Archie Bunker?

Day Dreamer

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Re: Tv
« Reply #100 on: June 02, 2013, 08:23:59 AM »
Another theory is that while Archie may have been all that you said, he was also not ALL those things. He was more of an amalgamation of every social problem of middle America.

As such, while no one (I hope) would say, "I'm just like him," most of us can say, "Yes, on a perticular subject, I'm exactly like him. Oh, shit! I never realised how bad that looked. Up until now, I thought it was okay."
For you to insult me, first I must value your opinion

A-Train

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Re: Tv
« Reply #101 on: June 02, 2013, 08:39:03 AM »
Interesting synopsis, but I can't agree with you about the state of human rights in America when the show first aired in January of 1971.  Recall the heated brawls that occurred over the busing issues; and these did not take place until years after.  Gays had no place in public and, I believe, was still considered a disease by the American Psychiatric Association.  And women's rights?  What professional options did an adult woman have in 1971?  Let alone social ones; Roe v Wade was not decided for another two years.

The social issues that surfaced, and in some cases decided by the courts, in the '60's were only just being digested in the early '70's and "All In The Family" helped to assuage the opposition by just familiarizing millions of people to the issue and putting a face on those demanding rights.

Your evaluation is a good one for 2013 and even for many people in 1971, but it's an understatement to say that the issues that Archie faced during the show where already moot points.  There was still some very real, heated and widespread opposition to the specific issues and the cultural changes in general.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

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Re: Tv
« Reply #102 on: June 02, 2013, 09:12:14 AM »
@ DD: Yes, I think that's one of the aspects of that show I like very much.

@ A-Train: Thanks for the feedback. I was born in '68, so I wasn't old enough to know how much was just new to TV or just getting integrated into society. There are a lot of important and of course valid social issues, like those you mentioned, but the reason I think the show was cleverly programmed is that the way the argument is presented through the drama, it seems to me that the complexity of the issue comes down to a simplistic for or against because if you're not totally for every aspect of: women's rights, gay rights, racial equality, then you're a bigot like Archie.

Sometimes the validity of those issues get used like a social wedge to create a polarized audience, which is the part of the programming I don't care for. Perhaps that's just part of the process, but I'm sort of waiting for things to settle down instead of continuing to accelerate toward extremes, which still leaves people on the outside who were supposed to benefit from those changes.

xwarrior

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Re: Tv
« Reply #103 on: June 04, 2013, 07:32:15 AM »
 


Sopranos named best-written US TV series

The New Jersey mob saga The Sopranos was listed as the best-written US TV series above comedy show Seinfeld in a list compiled by the Writers Guild of America.

The guild, which represents writers in the motion picture, broadcast, cable and new media industries, released its ranking of the 101 best-written TV shows based on a poll of its members, with comedies and dramatic series evenly represented in the top 10.

The guild favored recently-produced shows. Only one top 10 entry, third-placed The Twilight Zone, pre-dated the 1970s and nearly half the entire list aired in the past decade.

In releasing the list with The Sopranos at the top, the guild's Paul Brownfield said: "No show has been more responsible for TV's storytelling renaissance." In the HBO hit, mobster Tony Soprano, played by James Gandolfini, struggles with domestic life even as he orders mob hits and confides in his psychiatrist.

Comedies joining Seinfeld high in the poll included 1970s-era hits as All in the Family, The Mary Tyler Moore Show and M*A*S*H, along with bar-room comedy Cheers.

The West Wing, The Wire and Mad Men, the only currently airing show, rounded out the top 10.

Long-running animated show The Simpsons was ranked 11th, followed by the 1950s hit I Love Lucy. The Daily Show With Jon Stewart at 17 placed highest among series outside the scripted comedy or drama format.

Coming in 43rd, PBS' Downton Abbey was the highest-ranked non-US series, followed by the BBC's The Office in 50th place.

While most of the series on the list were hits in their day or at least enjoyed a steady run, the short-lived Twin Peaks (35), Friday Night Lights (22) and the cult series Arrested Development (16) also fared well.

And while NBC, CBS and HBO were all represented in the top 10 with multiple entries, the list's highest-ranked ABC series was the comedy Taxi in 19th, followed by Lost in 27th place.


The Top 101


1. The Sopranos

2. Seinfeld

3. The Twilight Zone

4. All in the Family

5. M*A*S*H

6. The Mary Tyler Moore Show

7. Mad Men

8. Cheers

9. The Wire

10. The West Wing

11. The Simpsons

12. I Love Lucy

13.  Breaking Bad

14.  The Dick Van Dyke Show

15.  Hill Street Blues

16.  Arrested Development

17.  The Daily Show

18.  Six Feet Under

19.  Taxi

20.  The Larry Sanders Show

21.  30 Rock

22.  Friday Night Lights

23.  Frasier

24.  Friends

25.  Saturday Night Live

26.  The X-Files

27.  Lost

28.  ER

29.  The Cosby Show

30.  Curb Your Enthusiasm

31.  The Honeymooners

32.  Deadwood

33.  Star Trek

34.  Modern Family

35.  Twin Peaks

36.  NYPD Blue

37.  The Carol Burnett Show

38.  Battlestar Galactica

39.  Sex and the City

40.  Game of Thrones

41.  The Bob Newhart Show

42.  Your Show of Shows

43.  Downton Abbey

44.  Law & Order

45.  Thirtysomething

46.  St. Elsewhere

47.  Homicide: Life on the Street

48.  Homeland

49.  Buffy the Vampire Slayer

50.  The Good Wife

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51.  The Colbert Report

52.  The Office (British version)

53.  Northern Exposure

54.  The Wonder Years

55.  L.A. Law

56.  Sesame Street

57.  Columbo

58.  The Rockford Files

59.  Fawlty Towers

60.  Moonlighting

61.  Freaks and Geeks

62.  Roots

63.  Everybody Loves Raymond

64.  South Park

65.  Playhouse 90

66.  The Office (U.S. version)

67.  Dexter

68.  My So-Called Life

69.  Golden Girls

70.  The Andy Griffith Show

71.  The Shield

72.  Roseanne

73.  24

74.  Murphy Brown

75.  House

76.  Barney Miller

77.  I, Claudius

78.  The Odd Couple

79.  Star Trek: The Next Generation

80.  Alfred Hitchcock Presents

81.  Upstairs Downstairs

82.  Monty Python's Flying Circus

83.  Get Smart

84.  Gunsmoke

85.  The Defenders

86.  Sergeant Bilko

87.  Justified

88.  Band of Brothers

89.  Rowan & Martin's Laugh-In

90.  The Prisoner

91.  The Muppet Show

92.  Absolutely Fabulous

93.  Boardwalk Empire

94.  Will and Grace

95.  Family Ties

96.  Lonesome Dove

97.  Soap

98.  The Fugitive

99.  Louie

100.  Late Night With David Letterman

101.  Oz

http://www.stuff.co.nz/entertainment/tv/8752447/Sopranos-named-best-written-US-TV-series
 04/06/2013
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A-Train

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Re: Tv
« Reply #104 on: June 04, 2013, 07:38:07 AM »
I can't help but think that the following tells you all you need to know about how valid any list like this can be:


#12.  "I Love Lucy"

#77.  "I Claudius"
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck