• Home
  • Search
    •  
  • Login
    • Username: Password:

      Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: Unwed Mother  (Read 5896 times)

xwarrior

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 2238
Re: Unwed Mother
« Reply #15 on: November 09, 2010, 07:33:49 AM »
Quote
Anyone catch Raise the Red Lantern with th_aj Gong Li th_aj as Wife #4?

No.  kkkkkkkkkk
 Why do you ask?   mmmmmmmmmm
  Which one of the wives did you rate as No.1 ?  afafafafaf

The Chinese divorce process seems to be fast and cheap. While EL is right to think financial imperatives might hold many women back from going down that road the other factor is a tradition that it will bring shame on her.

One woman I know will not divorce her husband for that reason even though they are both well off and have successful careers       

PS  Sometimes in China I am asked if I believe in reincarnation.

I say, 'Yes, because I want to come back as a rich Chinese man and have a wife and 2 girlfriends.'

I have my standards. They may be low, but I have them.
- Bette Midler

Escaped Lunatic

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 9951
  • Finding new ways to conquer the world
    • EscapedLunatic.com
Re: Unwed Mother
« Reply #16 on: November 10, 2010, 03:53:18 AM »
Quote
Anyone catch Raise the Red Lantern with th_aj Gong Li th_aj as Wife #4?

No.  kkkkkkkkkk
 Why do you ask?   mmmmmmmmmm
  Which one of the wives did you rate as No.1 ?  afafafafaf

Silly question.  Her Eternal Loveliness, Gong Li. akakakakak akakakakak akakakakak

Quote
The Chinese divorce process seems to be fast and cheap. While EL is right to think financial imperatives might hold many women back from going down that road the other factor is a tradition that it will bring shame on her.

One woman I know will not divorce her husband for that reason even though they are both well off and have successful careers 
 

Yeah, divorce seems to hold more stigma here than in many other countries, but that does seem to be decreasing.  Add in the fact that a divorce hearing might bring out some unpleasant truths that would cause loss of face and some women will just put up with a man's indiscretions (and some men may put up with the same from their wives).

Quote
PS  Sometimes in China I am asked if I believe in reincarnation.

I say, 'Yes, because I want to come back as a rich Chinese man and have a wife and 2 girlfriends.'

Only 2 girlfriends?  I think you mean upper middle class, not rich.  ahahahahah
I'm pro-cloning and we vote!               Why isn't this card colored green?
EscapedLunatic.com

xwarrior

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 2238
Re: Unwed Mother
« Reply #17 on: May 08, 2012, 03:26:51 AM »
This news item has only a passing relevance to an old topic, but it does give some clues as to the situation faced by unwed mothers in China.

"   Children usually learn to speak around age 1, but for 3-year-old Tang Jiahao, in North China's Shanxi province, speaking and singing were seemingly impossible tasks.
Tang, from Taiyuan, the capital of Shanxi, is being brought up by his grandparents, who can neither speak nor hear.
His mother is a migrant worker who has not been home for nearly two and a half years.
The family lives in a small apartment, measuring less than 40 square meters. The staircases in the old apartment building are covered in thick dust, and cockroaches are rampant in the closet.
In March 2009, Tang's mother, Li Yanping, who is able to speak and hear, gave birth to him in remote Southwest China's Chongqing municipality, where she worked at the time. She was 18 years old at the time and unmarried - the legal marriage age for women in China is 20.
Tang's father was a migrant worker from a village in the Wanzhou district of Chongqing. He was sentenced to jail when Tang was about six months old, said Wang Shengtang, the boy's 77-year-old great-grandfather.
Tang's mother brought him to her hometown of Taiyuan after her husband was sentenced. She left the boy with her parents when he was eight months old and went back to Chongqing.
The child has been living with his grandparents without any oral communication since his mother left.
"His mother used to communicate with me through text messages, but she has not sent me any messages for nearly half a year," his grandmother told China Daily, by writing on a piece of paper. "We don't know where she is or what kind of job she is doing."
His mother promised to come back home before the Spring Festival this year, but she did not keep the promise, said his grandmother.
His mother told China Daily by telephone that she is scheduled to come back to see her son in mid-May. She declined to comment on her disappearance.
Tang's grandparents, both in their 50s, could not find a job and the family has no income.
The couple is worried because they cannot teach the boy to speak, and he has begun to imitate them by expressing himself with his hands.
To develop his hearing ability, his grandmother used the mobile phone's music tone to wake him up. The grandparents also turned up the volume of the small 14-inch television, the only source of human voices in the family most of the time.
Li Shumin, a doctor who is familiar with the boy, said that now is the key time for him to develop language abilities.
"Children of Tang's age have already started to learn to speak from their parents, and he is already lagging behind," she said. "But it's not too late, if he can learn to speak as soon as possible."
His grandmother tried to send him to the local kindergarten, but he was refused enrollment because he does not have a hukou (household registration) due to his birth outside of marriage.
Li Yanping, director of the residents' committee at the residential community where the boy and his grandparents live, said community workers have appealed to the local public security bureau to give Tang the hukou.
"He is expected to go to kindergarten in the autumn semester if everything goes smoothly," she told China Daily.
A local family with a 4-year-old son learned of Tang's plight last week through a local newspaper article and decided to help. Since last Thursday they have taken him in to stay with their family and play with their son. They teach him to speak on weekdays, and he returns to his grandparents on the weekend, Li said.
The supportive family even managed to send Tang to the local kindergarten on Friday for the first time, Li said.
"He managed to say 'close the door' and 'thanks' on Friday, which made us feel quite confident about his language abilities," she said.
Contact the writers at anbaijie@ chinadaily.com.cn and sunruisheng@chinadaily.com.cn"

http://usa.chinadaily.com.cn/china/2012-05/08/content_15231167.htm
I have my standards. They may be low, but I have them.
- Bette Midler