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Author Topic: Is there any nice way to stop the students from sticking with bad english names?  (Read 7185 times)

The Hiphoppopotomous

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The problem is, especially with business english classes, that they will struggle to be taken seriously by forigners when they introduce themselves as 'Actually' 'Why?' and 'Visual' I do like some of them, for example a guy called Lionheart and a girl called Whitebear.

I even bestowed the name of Arwen on a girl today as I feel it is criminally underused. However I drew the line, I desperately wanted to call a guy Boromir, but settled for tom, as it would cause him a lot of trouble in an actual business situation.

Stil

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Why do you want a nice way? What does that matter? You are their teacher not their BFF. Just tell them their names are ridiculous and they will not be taken seriously at all. No one will trust them and because their names are so bad their judgment will be considered poor. Tell them if they don't change their name, THEY WILL MAKE NO MONEY!

If they still don't want to change their name, forget about it. Their problem.
« Last Edit: September 27, 2010, 02:59:24 PM by Stil »

Borkya

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Personally, I encourage the crazy names. I figure, if they are just students in China, studying English and possibly will never use it outside of the classroom why not! I love that i have a Grape, Medusa and a Pluie and other crazy names. It sure as hell beats the other option in which I know 5 "Wendy's" 8 "Anne's" and "Ann's" and every boy with the name Kobe.

Of course if they are training to work abroad at some point, then yeah, a good english name is important, but for so many it isn't. So why not have  a little fun!

old34

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Do we need yet ANOTHER discussion of this topic (every f***ing semester)?

James, use the search function. Type in "names" in advanced search and then enjoy the fruits of the search...and the collective wisdom of those who have come before you and...surprise!...found that students had odd names.





Knowledge is knowing that a tomato is a fruit; wisdom is knowing not to put it in a fruit salad. - B. O'Driscoll.
TIC is knowing that, in China, your fruit salad WILL come with cherry tomatoes AND all slathered in mayo. - old34.

NATO

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Invictus

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Though his classmates said he was ill, I suspect one student got angry with me 'cause I--kindly but firmly--told him his name was not acceptable. His English name was "Pride," and he was committed to it because it was part of his Chinese name. Therefore, he was convinced it was perfect for him.

I can understand that but hey, you want to be an English major and "see the world," you can't walk around with something that makes you sound like you're some dumb rapper.
“就算杀了一个我,还有千千万万个我。“

xwarrior

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I agree with Stil

and

 :wtf:  old34 (sort of!)



I have my standards. They may be low, but I have them.
- Bette Midler

chinalin

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At the start of a new teaching year, with new students, I usually go armed with a folder, with names and meanings that I have printed.

When I have students with absolutely inappropriate names (bearing in mind that the ultimate aim of my nursing students is to work and/or study overseas) I take aside the ones that this applies to, suggest to them that their names will give them no credibility, and hand them the folder with the names.  Meanings do seem to be important to them.

But, if they insist that they really like their English 'name' then that is their choice.  I just feel that I need to give them the knowledge, with which they can make a better choice if they want to.

A couple of years ago, one of the odd names was Titty.  She was mortified when I told her what that would mean, in my country, and very quickly became Nicole.

Another year, two of the girls in a class were called Elephant and Phone, and one of the boys in the same class was called Shalala.  It is very difficult, I find, as a teacher, to speak to a 20 year old young man by name, when that is his name!!

Lin
Zhaoqing, Guangdong.

 bxbxbxbxbx

The Hiphoppopotomous

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I used the search function and typed in English names' figuring names would be too wide a search peramiter for some reason.

I'm sure i'll enjoy reading the archives though!

kitano

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Why do you want a nice way? What does that matter? You are their teacher not their BFF. Just tell them their names are ridiculous and they will not be taken seriously at all. No one will trust them and because their names are so bad their judgment will be considered poor. Tell them if they don't change their name, THEY WILL MAKE NO MONEY!

If they still don't want to change their name, forget about it. Their problem.

that just gives me a really funny image of a guy yelling at a 6 year old girl 'Starlight??? you sound like a fucking IDIOT!!!'

i wish i could draw a cartoon

teacheraus

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Though his classmates said he was ill, I suspect one student got angry with me 'cause I--kindly but firmly--told him his name was not acceptable. His English name was "Pride," and he was committed to it because it was part of his Chinese name. Therefore, he was convinced it was perfect for him.

I can understand that but hey, you want to be an English major and "see the world," you can't walk around with something that makes you sound like you're some dumb rapper.

But in this case you have done more than criticize his choice of English names - you have also told him that his Chinese name or at least the meaning it has is also not acceptable. And as you know meaning is all important in parents choosing the names for their children. I personally would not have made statments like unacceptable for his name - It does not for me fall into the unacceptable "likely to cause major problems" category. And I think that the best names often do have meanings similar to their Chinese names.
Sometimes it seems things go by too quickly. We are so busy watching out for what's just ahead of us that we don't take the time to enjoy where we are. (Calvin and Hobbs)

Escaped Lunatic

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Gently let them know that they might want something more "common" or "traditional" to go on their business cards.  Other than that, keep a list of the best ones and post it in the saloon. ahahahahah
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kitano

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another phenomenon i remember from teaching kids in korea is the 7 year old girls with 'cute' names that were actually hooker names :D

The Local Dialect

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We've been doing a unit on names in my 10th grade class and today we looked at this site http://www.behindthename.com/ which gives meanings and backgrounds for pretty much every name under the sun. It was fun for the students to look up their English names and seeing the names and their history made some of the students think about their choice of name.

This year most of my students actually have pretty sensible names, which is probably a first.

Borkya

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Aww, c'mon, Johnson's not so bad. I mean, yes it has another meaning, but I know many a people named Johnson (okay, last name, but still.)

I mean, I always thought "Dick" was the worst name ever, but it is still quite popular in the world as people's real name. So Johnson's not so bad.