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Author Topic: IELTS examining  (Read 50746 times)

jpd01

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #60 on: May 08, 2011, 09:58:50 AM »
Well I was just curious really, this is always the contention: if you follow the letter of the law to the letter you cannot work outside the employer that is stated on your residents permit. However if you have a SAFEA contract that states you can with permission. As far as private schools go I don't know any that allow it or have the ability to allow it even if they wanted to.
It's been tested a few times with results on both sides of the coin ( ie its been ok to work outside if you have a SAFEA contract and sometimes not)
Strictly speaking the council or whoever is asking its part timers and free lancers to break the law in order to work for them.
"I don't understand what I did wrong except live a life that everyone is jealous of." Charlie Sheen.

memnoch87

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #61 on: May 20, 2011, 08:58:33 AM »
2 more years then I can apply!

MK

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #62 on: May 19, 2012, 07:49:42 AM »
Just bumping this to say IELTS is growing fast in China, more test centres are opening, and that means more examiners are needed:

Quote
You will need:
• An undergraduate degree or a qualification which can be demonstrated to be equivalent to an undergraduate degree.
• A recognised qualification in Teaching English to Speakers of Other Languages (TESOL) or recognised equivalent as part of a recognised university award course.
• At least 3 years’ full time (or the equivalent part time) relevant TESOL teaching experience (minimum one year post certificate level qualification). The majority of this teaching experience must relate to adult students (16 years and over).
• The required professional attributes and interpersonal skills.

http://www.britishcouncil.org/china-aboutus-jobvacancy.htm#examiner

Pashley

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #63 on: May 20, 2012, 03:23:20 AM »
Can anyone tell what they are paying now?

I last did it about 6 years ago. At the time, it was 88 an interview. A two-hour block was split into six 20-minute slots, five interviews & a break. That works out to 220rmb/hour. At that time (at least in the places I was) written tests were on Saturday morning, interviews Saturday afternoon and all day
Sunday. You'd do 25-30 interviews a weekend, so 2200-2600 plus a good expense allowances.

Since then I know the rate has gone up, but I am not sure how much. Also, I hear there is enough demand that in many places they now do interviews on Fridays and/or Mondays.
Who put a stop payment on my reality check?

Calach Pfeffer

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #64 on: May 20, 2012, 01:53:27 PM »
Can anyone tell what they are paying now?

I last did it about 6 years ago. At the time, it was 88 an interview. A two-hour block was split into six 20-minute slots, five interviews & a break. That works out to 220rmb/hour. At that time (at least in the places I was) written tests were on Saturday morning, interviews Saturday afternoon and all day
Sunday. You'd do 25-30 interviews a weekend, so 2200-2600 plus a good expense allowances.

Since then I know the rate has gone up, but I am not sure how much. Also, I hear there is enough demand that in many places they now do interviews on Fridays and/or Mondays.


I last examined over six months ago now. (I got tired and gave up.) As I recall (possibly foggily) these days it's 100+ per interview (106?). And actually, the last test I worked was a Saturday through Monday. I don't know how common three day tests are presently. They happened a few times a year where I was.

» now with New and Endlessly Improving CV 4U  ٩( ᐛ )و

Fozzwaldus

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #65 on: May 20, 2012, 04:37:52 PM »
the first rule of IELTS examining is NEVER TALK ABOUT IELTS EXAMINING!!!!!!!!

having said that, the Beijing office is desperate for examiners (they cover the entire north of China), so much so that they ship out all of their Beijing-based people every weekend, and ship in a fleet of crack testing commandos from Ningbo.  ababababab
两只老外, 两只老外,跑得快,跑得快,
一个是老酒鬼,一个是老色鬼,真奇怪, 真奇怪

El Macho

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #66 on: May 21, 2012, 11:29:18 AM »
If they're going to send you up to BJ again, let me know – I can't promise you a great time, but could at least offer a not-too-boring drink.

The Local Dialect

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #67 on: May 21, 2012, 11:39:46 AM »
Fozz, are they still so desperate that they'll consider people with lots of experience but without a TEFL certificate? I remember a few years back hearing that they occasionally waived the requirement on a case by case basis. I don't have a TEFL but I've been teaching for almost a decade ...

/hijack We should all get up together in Beijing sometime in fact! I can even get a babysitter for the kids. ;) /end hijack

Fozzwaldus

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #68 on: May 21, 2012, 12:03:12 PM »
I think that would be worth a shot, TLD

they don't really bother screening us Ningbonese, cos they know we come pre-screened. I don't really know about the general process - maybe one of the other memebers could chime in?

I'd say worth a shot for sure.
两只老外, 两只老外,跑得快,跑得快,
一个是老酒鬼,一个是老色鬼,真奇怪, 真奇怪

MK

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #69 on: May 22, 2012, 12:16:58 AM »
Yeah it's worth a shot; "recognised...TESOL...or recognised equivalent".  Without a recognised TESOL cert' you'll have to prove to them you have a high level of language awareness (which of course you do, and a TESOL cert doesn't always provide that anyway), but give it a go.

They never send me anywhere cool...I've been to Zhengzhou and Hefei a lot though!

Fozzwaldus

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #70 on: May 22, 2012, 01:24:20 AM »
They never send me anywhere cool...I've been to Zhengzhou and Hefei a lot though!

Hefei - nice  ahahahahah ahahahahah
两只老外, 两只老外,跑得快,跑得快,
一个是老酒鬼,一个是老色鬼,真奇怪, 真奇怪

Li Fu

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #71 on: October 03, 2013, 03:17:03 PM »
I have been teaching IELTS since 2005 in China and have helped many students get their needed score or better.
Last year, I applied for an examiner's job in Thailand, but could not even get an interview. This peeved, me not only because of my experience, but also that I met an examiner once here in China, who was not a native speaker, and was a hopeless teacher as well as being a bit of a con man and a wanker. I don't know if he still is an examiner, but can some of you examiners on here tell me if there is any secret to scoring a post? I have all the qualifications and references, and have weekends free.

Pashley

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #72 on: October 03, 2013, 04:29:46 PM »
I applied for an examiner's job in Thailand, but could not even get an interview. ... can some of you examiners on here tell me if there is any secret to scoring a post? I have all the qualifications and references, and have weekends free.

You might re-apply in a different place. There are a Brit & an Aussie organisation involved. In some places, one has a monopoly -- Brits in Prague, Aussies in Fiji, etc. In others, I think including Thailand, they run separate competing programs so if one turns you down, you can try the other. My understanding is that China is the only place where they have some sort of joint venture.

There is a restriction that you cannot simultaneously be an examiner and teach IELTS preparation courses. Could that be the problem?
Who put a stop payment on my reality check?

MK

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #73 on: October 04, 2013, 12:27:32 AM »
Quote
There is a restriction that you cannot simultaneously be an examiner and teach IELTS preparation courses.

They lifted that restriction a couple of years ago - now you (and more importantly your school) are just not allowed to advertise the fact that you are an examiner.

In terms of getting in, it's probably easier in China than Thailand (bigger programme, more demand) but they can also be a bit picky about what constitutes "recognized TESOL Cert or equivalent".

Just Like Mr Benn

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Re: IELTS examining
« Reply #74 on: October 04, 2013, 03:38:21 AM »
I wonder why Li Fu didn't get an interview. My guess is that Thailand simply didn't need new examiners. There is way, way more work in China than in any other country in the world. There's a lot of examiners as well, but my feeling is that regions like to have too many rather than too few.

So, if you have the quals and experience, I'd have thought they'd definitely give you the phone interview, unless there's something dreadful in your application. I expect it was just the not needing examiners thing. Didn't they give you a reason?

From then on though, maybe it can get tough. I don't think passing the phone interview is a formality. It lasts half an hour. They wouldn't spend that much time if they were just checking that you could speak English.

Then you have the 2 day training and accreditation. People's best guesses are that only half pass that first time, though it can vary widely. You can keep taking it till you pass though, not that that would necessarily be a good idea.

Then you're in, although you're regularly monitored to check you're giving the correct scores.

I'm not sure there are any secrets. I found that the people who asked lots of questions during training, were the ones who passed. You'd have to guard against the assumption that you know it all because of your experience IELTS training. Based on IELTS trainers I've met, and the methods that some candidates think will work, I think that a lot of IELTS training, at least for the speaking exam, might be rubbish.

The IELTS books that students show me are rubbish. Candidates need to be prepared for the format of the exam. Other than that I think it's down to how good you are at English.

So, that's my one piece of advice. Don't assume you already know it all, or indeed anything. If you start telling Examiner Trainers in the interview how to pass the IELTS, there's a pretty good chance that you'll come across as an idiot.

Some people think that they deliberately weed out wankers. Certainly the incidence of this condition is much lower amongst examiners than it is in the general china ESL population, though I doubt anyone would claim it was extinct. Whether you're a good teacher is probably completely irrelevant to whether you're a good examiner. I think they're 2 largely different sets of skills. As for the con man thing, again examiners tend to be much more in touch with reality than a lot of the teachers and IELTS tutors I meet, but maybe being a good conman would be helpful as an IELTS tutor. They're essentially selling snake oil. Not useful for examiners.

This is all just my personal take. Other people have a lot more experience and knowledge.