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Author Topic: Witnessing Violence  (Read 15492 times)

Lotus Eater

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #30 on: December 14, 2009, 04:24:16 AM »

Or he could be a cat guy...


scratches were too wide for cat, unless it was an old man lion!  definitely nice broad human scratch marks.  And they were finger-spaced across his nose and down his cheek.

Saw him again, and am still not brave enough to ask.  kkkkkkkkkk kkkkkkkkkk

A-Train

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #31 on: December 14, 2009, 02:41:17 PM »
Perhaps it was "Tiger Woods" syndrome.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

latefordinner

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #32 on: December 15, 2009, 02:18:14 AM »
Has he been found out on the grass snoring?

MK

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #33 on: December 29, 2009, 05:17:47 AM »
Two very relevant stories from the excellent ChinaSmack Blog:

Warning - violence!

Wenzhou Man Beats Pregnant Woman Over Ice Cream Cone

The bystander effect.

But on the other hand...

Wenzhou Chinese Man Throws Bicycle To Stop Thieves

It's as cool as it sounds.  Very 'NB'.


Lotus Eater

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #34 on: December 29, 2009, 05:48:28 AM »
Also heard recently about an FT who was sleeping with his students.  2 of the students complained about him and he nearly beat one to death.  Not a good look for FTs.

Eagle

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    • Through a Jungian Lens
Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #35 on: December 30, 2009, 12:37:32 AM »
Two very relevant stories from the excellent ChinaSmack Blog:

Warning - violence!

Wenzhou Man Beats Pregnant Woman Over Ice Cream Cone



It's absolutely insane that no one stopped to help out the women.  There certainly were enough people present to make a difference without risking being hurt themselves.
“… whatever reality may be, it will to some extent be shaped by the lens
through which we see it.” (James Hollis)

latefordinner

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #36 on: December 30, 2009, 06:36:15 AM »
What can I say about that guy throwing his bike? Wow.

Had the same question, Eagle. Maybe that would make a good assignment for a writing class. Compare the 2 stories and expalain why people can sometimes act like heros and sometimes be useless dorks. (Maybe it's because she was their boss and that just reflects how they felt about her. I've had bosses like that.)

dragonsaver

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #37 on: December 30, 2009, 07:31:06 AM »
Also, she was 2 months pregnant, so she wouldn't have been showing yet.  The bad guy and the others would not have known she was pregnant.

However, she was a female and should not be subject to violence anyhow.  Neither should guys for that matter.  bjbjbjbjbj
Be kind to dragons for thou are crunchy when roasted and taste good with brie.

Granny Mae

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #38 on: January 01, 2010, 11:16:00 PM »
I know this topic started about what was happening in China, but my experience in Australia seems to indicate that irrespective of Nationality,people react in a similar manner in certain circumstances. I discussed this with two of my brothers who were firemen. Because of their training, they respond automatically to often life threatening circumstances. One thought that the fear of litigation stopped a lot of people from going to help others; I felt that this would be rare given my many experiences. I won't mention them all, just my first and last experiences to show how little I have seen change over the last 45 years. When I was about 18 or 19, I was walking down the main street in Darwin and it was very busy. A man was being kicked unconscious by another man as people walked past or around them on the main footpath. I grabbed the attacker by the arm and told him to stop before he killed this other man whom he was kicking in the head at this stage. The guy threw me to the ground and told me to mind my own business as I didn't know what this guy had done. Meanwhile the Chemist watched on from his shop a few feet away. I then lay across the top of the guy on the ground to protect his head and screamed at the Chemist to call an ambulance, I threatened the attacker with the Police if he kicked me. A struggle ensued on the ground (Thank goodness I had six brothers  bfbfbfbfbf) but the attacker fled after the Chemist called the Police and Ambulance. My point being that during this time, NO ONE tried to help in any way. How does one live with the Bystander Effect? I can't or couldn't!
In the last few months I have had two more "experiences" One of a man lying, passed out, against a shop window in the middle of the main Mall in Brisbane and another just a week ago of an old man who appeared to have passed out in a motorised type of wheel chair in the middle of a busy shopping centre. Yes, you guessed it, NO ONE stopped to investigate or to try to help if necessary. I was the only one who attended to them BOTH. In both instances, people stopped to look or stared as they passed by. WHAT THE HELL IS WRONG WITH PEOPLE!!!
Surely there was no danger to them in the last two cases?

A-Train

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #39 on: January 04, 2010, 07:11:09 PM »
http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bystander_effect

Not very encouraging information.  Some answers are better left unquestioned.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

Granny Mae

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #40 on: January 05, 2010, 02:04:38 AM »
Thanks for that info A-Train. How sad is it that I have had to take action to ensure that there is a chance that I will be helped if I "go down" with my heart or whatever whilst I'm walking my dog. I have had to advise a lot of people, on the route I take my dog, that I may need help. I carry medical info in a bag and they know to come and help me if the occasion arises. I find it very sad that one of the main lessons I have learned about mankind is that there is a very strong possibility that no one will help in these types of situations. alalalalal Believe me, I do speak from experience but I will not go into any more at this stage.

joe

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #41 on: January 21, 2010, 07:24:42 PM »
deleted
« Last Edit: September 11, 2010, 02:55:02 AM by joe »

A-Train

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #42 on: September 11, 2010, 12:53:40 AM »
My British roommate was very recently clocked in the nose by a local while on the danced floor.  Seems the Chinese man didn't like his looks and hauled off and decked my friend.  Very dramatic and bloody but he refused to call the police despite others in the group suggesting it.  Not sure I would have called either.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

Dex

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #43 on: September 20, 2010, 10:45:58 AM »
This is an interesting topic and one which highlights the darker side of Chinese culture.

In Hunan, where I live, there is a local TV channel dedicated to what seems like 24Hr broadcasting of domestics. Have yee al' seen it? Perhaps not. My girlfriend loves it and it's pretty much prime time. The Chinese love it. Well, we all know, they do love gossip!

But this reveals -along with my own experiences- a scary and almost mob-like attitude from the Chinese which I will go into now.

But the thing to bear in mind, is generally (and of course each situation can vary dpending on who is being victimised) do not get involved in any way with any disturbance in any way.

Sounds callous and cowardly doesn't it? But yes, many situations 'back home' would warrant an immediate hero-like intervention, especially if a girl is being clearly abused or attacked. But I have seen so often how locals just stare or keep on walking by here. They believe you shouldn't interfere in anyone elses business or you'll share their grief in some way. There is an ancient proverb on that, which I now forget. This is a culture of see no evil, hear no evil and so on.

The story:

Back in Xinjiang (Hami) I was riding my bicycle along a very well marked bike lane at a reasonably slow speed – very slow in fact. Both hands on bars and all seemed fine, until, in a split second, a toddler fell into the path of my tyres! Naturally, I screeched to a halt and managed to run over the baby’s arm but avoided his head by an inch. Sweaty and perplexed, I naturally got off and asked his grandmother if he was OK – she’d been sitting idly at the side, while she let her grandson straddle the kerb – with these obvious consequences.

In moments, the father and a swathe of family arrived and immediately demanded I go to hospital with them. So I did. The baby looked fine, just bruised – but his crying of course elevated the situation. On the way to the hospital (five min walk and within sight) I suspected something wasn’t going to go to plan and called my girlfriend to ‘help translate’. She arrived at the hospital and they’d just seen the doc who’d given them various simple medicines and of course, the bill. That’s when it kicked off. They demanded I pay, despite doing no wrong. They argued and screamed –security was called and did nothing as usual- with my girlfriend giving granny what for. Almost fists and certainly some spitting. I was shocked at this whole situation.

I called my FAO but she was unable to come. Eventually we huffed out of the hospital and they’d threatened to see our bosses. Fearing they might contact the local PSB I went to the PSB first, told them my side and to look out for ‘their crazy lies’ if they came knocking. They took a note but seemed more interested in giving me cigarettes and talking about Beckham. The family did visit my school and director and ‘to keep the peace’ I was ordered to visit their house and apologise with a basket of fruit. I said in rather harsher terms… ‘no way mate’. In the end I never did go – over my dead corpse and the issue withered away, luckily.

My girlfriend also told me that if the police/courts had been involved, the norm is that both parties pay half all cost of whatever. This applies to almost any kind of case (but of course, it saves everyone hassle if the foreigner is just ordered to leave the city within 48hrs! – I’ve heard this happen). There seems to be no interest in finding out the truth! So beware. Especially if you’re foreign, people are friendly until they can find any crappy reason to shout, argue, grab you and march you to the police all to get some money from you. Scary eh?

It’s an underlying form of racism that is definitely here – like all countries in some way or another. Now, as much as I love China, that helped me understand this kind of ‘don’t get involved’ attitude (very sad isn’t it?). I heard other foreigners on bikes who’d had rougher times before me… for example, riding along, a local woman rides the opposite way talking on her mobile, and they crash. Immediately, the guilty one shouts and yells to everyone it was this foreigners’ fault and in no time at all she was surrounding by a group, mob, of locals yelling at her… with racist comments.

Pity isn’t it? Such a wonderful nation – but beware the dark streak of mob-ish-ness. If you are a foreigner, doing the right thing or not, you’re putting yourself into a huge firing line if you intercept in someone’s trouble.

It’s the dark side Luke! Beware the Force!
Train + China + Spring Festival = Torture

Dex

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Re: Witnessing Violence
« Reply #44 on: September 20, 2010, 11:00:47 AM »
I would like to tell you an even scarier story set in the south...

I won’t type it fully as sometimes forums are monitored ‘somehow’ (not referring to you Raoul).

Essentially, it involved a small group of party going foreigners who ended getting attacked by locals but after some pretty hairy fighting (with bricks and such like) they were completely surrounded by what seemed to be a neighbourhood of people – just assuming the foreigners were to blame… thankfully the police arrived to restore calm, but that shook me up when I heard it.

Watch out lads.
Train + China + Spring Festival = Torture