• Home
  • Search
    •  
  • Login
    • Username: Password:

      Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: Copyright  (Read 4068 times)

contemporarydog

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 2297
Re: Copyright
« Reply #15 on: October 09, 2009, 06:17:53 PM »
downloading copied movies and music is breaking the law, not sure about books

re: have you ever broken the law, everyone has broken the law in some way or another

it's just as against the laW, except for books over 50 years old
It is too early to say.

synthette58

  • Guest
Re: Copyright
« Reply #16 on: October 11, 2009, 04:11:57 PM »
And who amongst us (Brits only here, please!) didn't surreptitiously listen to Radio Caroline?? (and avidly record the Top 40 on Sunday evenings!!) Under the covers? Awaiting the knock on the door?
'Allo, 'Allo?

Keep the 'net and the WWW "free".......especially from Elton John!

Remember............'first, they burned books!'......
 ababababab

Eagle

  • Limboid
  • Posts: 1117
    • Through a Jungian Lens
Re: Copyright
« Reply #17 on: October 14, 2009, 01:39:02 AM »
Well, I am a published writer and photographer and I believe in copyright.  First, I place much of my work on-line with the intent that others will read and enjoy (if possible).  I don't expect them to copy it and use it without permission.  It's important to know and approve the use of one's creative efforts.  I'd hate to have my stuff used (misused) to promote ideals or values that are antithical to mine.  It isn't only about the money.  And yes, I have made some money from my efforts.  Making some money doesn't make me the enemy either.  It was simply a fact that there was a market and I was lucky enough to make a few dollars.

Do I break copyright laws as they stand?  Yes I do as a teacher.  Yes I do as a consumer.  But, I don't do so with the intent of defrauding the authors, the musicians, the actors.  I doubt that there is any one who would emerge as innocent.  That said, I reiterate, copyright is important.
“… whatever reality may be, it will to some extent be shaped by the lens
through which we see it.” (James Hollis)

Foscolo

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 525
  • Boom boom!
    • ELTpublishing
Re: Copyright
« Reply #18 on: October 15, 2009, 07:51:09 PM »
I too have written some books - minor ESL stuff. The royalties have been pathetically low and the publishers have turned down subsequent offers of material on the grounds that the bottom has fallen out of the ESL publishing market, especially for supplementary materials.

Now, I don't think my books themselves are much pirated - they're not at all well known. But the general principal these days is that teachers expect to get stuff for free (pirated or otherwise) off the internet. So as an author, my livelihood has been damaged.

And yet, I download pirated music, computer programs and books from the internet all the time, so I really can't complain when I lose out myself.


P.S. The vast majority of bands have such rotten recording contracts that even before widespread downloading, they made little or nothing from CD sales, yet prices of CDs were very high, especially in Europe.
Free stuff for teaching English with jokes: ESLjokes.net.

Leon Purvis

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 39
Re: Copyright
« Reply #19 on: March 29, 2010, 11:30:51 PM »
Well, I am a published writer and photographer and I believe in copyright.  First, I place much of my work on-line with the intent that others will read and enjoy (if possible).  I don't expect them to copy it and use it without permission.  It's important to know and approve the use of one's creative efforts.  I'd hate to have my stuff used (misused) to promote ideals or values that are antithical to mine.  It isn't only about the money.  And yes, I have made some money from my efforts.  Making some money doesn't make me the enemy either.  It was simply a fact that there was a market and I was lucky enough to make a few dollars.


I'm also a published and publishing photographer/writer. There have been a few changes to International and American copyright law as it pertains to photography and text. Though in principle a work is copyrighted as soon as the photo is made, the ability to collect on unauthorized use of your photo has become more difficult. If the work has not been formally and legally copyrighted before publication (this includes the internet)awards are drastically reduced by the court. This is largely because it is more difficult to claim ownership after the image has been published. Periodicals (both online and print)often carry an ISSN number (International Standardized Serial Number) which helps to identify the specific issue. This was once all that was needed to prove ownership rights if credit was given to the author/photographer in that specific issue. It is now suggested that writer and photographer alike copyright his work before publishing it. Most times, a news publication is granted automatic rights upon publication because it follows up its publication with a formal application/submission for copyright.

If you put a picture online, don't expect to be able to have an easy time collecting usage fees unless it's backed up with proof of formally obtained copyright (e.g. Library of Congress registration).
I count my blessings when I consider the plight of the boneless chicken.

harry_aus

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 170
  • "woof!"
Re: Copyright
« Reply #20 on: May 24, 2010, 02:01:36 PM »
Back in the mid-1990s I wrote, and had published,
a non-fiction historical narrative. Copyright laws here in Australia are quite strict.

Numerous times over the years I've come across large chunks of text from
my book, in the books and magazines written by others on the
same subject. (sometimes I'm cited,
sometimes not).

But I've never cared a rats-a about this. Consider it as a sort of a compliment!