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Author Topic: CV Writing  (Read 4659 times)

A-Train

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CV Writing
« on: March 08, 2009, 12:27:09 AM »
Could someone direct me to a thread in the Saloon or a link elsewhere that can help me tailor my CV for a job search teaching in China?  I've worked in finance for years so I the exaggeration part should come naturally.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

Schnerby

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #1 on: March 08, 2009, 12:49:59 AM »
I've worked in finance for years so I the exaggeration part should come naturally.

 bibibibibi That's a worry.

If you're caucasian make sure you put a picture!

Raoul F. Duke

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #2 on: March 08, 2009, 01:53:22 AM »
I'm not sure you need to alter your resume at all.

For one thing, the standards required to get most teaching jobs are frightfully low... aoaoaoaoao

In your case, I suspect that your current resume already shows that you are well-educated and have had a respectable working career. That's MUCH more than enough in the vast majority of cases. Unless you have teaching experience or other applicable credentials not already on your resume, I doubt you need to change a thing.

Getting a teaching job in China is very little like getting a job in the West. In China, you'll be a scarce commodity and won't have to sweat finding a job nearly as much.

Relax. agagagagag
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

A-Train

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #3 on: March 08, 2009, 05:01:43 PM »
"I've worked in finance for years so I the exaggeration part should come naturally"

"That's a worry."

No worries...not the kind of Finance that's been in the papers these last months.  I've worked for manufacturing companies helping them spend their money wisely.  Usually expansions.

"If you're caucasian make sure you put a picture!"

I was planning on gettinga Billy Idol hair coloring before getting the picture taken.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

Nolefan

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #4 on: March 08, 2009, 05:17:39 PM »

yeah, as they said, 80% of the time, no one ever looks at your resume! pictures rule in the middle kingdom!!  aaaaaaaaaa aaaaaaaaaa

that said, there are a few schools/unis that do take the time to check things out but they're mostly interested in degree and major.

Being a fellow finance major, I found that using simple words and dumbing things down worked a bit better than using industry-specific terms or complicated words...
alors régressons fatalement, eternellement. Des débutants, avec la peur comme exutoire à l'ignorance et Alzheimer en prof d'histoire de nos enfances!
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Schnerby

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #5 on: March 09, 2009, 12:24:04 AM »

I was planning on gettinga Billy Idol hair coloring before getting the picture taken.

Do it!

It has nothing to do with the picture, it would just be alot of fun.

cheekygal

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #6 on: March 09, 2009, 02:55:32 AM »
There is always Photoshop...

Con ate dog

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #7 on: March 09, 2009, 02:18:23 PM »
The finance background will have schools drooling.  My advice: be fussy in your job search.
And there is no liar like the indignant man... -Nietszche

Nothing is so fatiguing as the eternal hanging on of an uncompleted task. -William James

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dragonsaver

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #8 on: March 09, 2009, 11:29:10 PM »
I still think you could get a job at my Uni in Dalian.  You could teach in the academic program.  bfbfbfbfbf  Pay is good, benefits are good, fellow teachers are great!! akakakakak
Be kind to dragons for thou are crunchy when roasted and taste good with brie.

A-Train

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #9 on: March 10, 2009, 02:33:47 AM »
Sounds like a plot.  I was planning on taking a two-week vacation to China this summer, perhaps Dalian should be on my itinerary.
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

Raoul F. Duke

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #10 on: March 10, 2009, 02:46:05 AM »
Dalian is a great town! If you can't live near Suzhou, then Dalian should be near the top of the list. It's not a tremendous tourist town (most tourists there are domestic, coming to the beaches to escape the ravages of summer), but it rates highly as a place to live.

And back to the topic, I hope you're getting a lot of reinforcement: your resume is better than fine the way it is. bjbjbjbjbj
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

A-Train

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #11 on: March 10, 2009, 12:12:31 PM »
"If you can't live near Suzhou, then Dalian should be near the top of the list."

Why is that?  My brief search shows it to be very historical and cultural, but huge.  The weather looks great, but how is the pollution and congestion?
"The young do not know enough to be prudent, and therefore attempt the impossible and achieve it, generation after generation.

Pearl S. Buck

dragonsaver

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #12 on: March 11, 2009, 04:22:01 AM »
Very little pollution.   akakakakak  Not much congestion except a rush hour and major holidays.  Might take 30 min to go downtown then instead of 15-20.  ahahahahah

The city is clean.  Very little litter on the streets.  People actually put garbage into the garbage containers on the street.  What does go on the street is swept up by workers almost immediately.  akakakakak akakakakak
Be kind to dragons for thou are crunchy when roasted and taste good with brie.

Ibballard

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #13 on: March 25, 2009, 05:20:08 PM »
I was curious about this same topic.  My bachelor's is in international business, with a minor in Chinese, andd I feel like this indicates to some teaching centers that you are not a "serious teacher".  Is this a problem ever, or is it really "white-face plus native english speaker = good to go"?

Raoul F. Duke

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Re: CV Writing
« Reply #14 on: March 25, 2009, 10:35:54 PM »
First, I'll ditto DS...
Both Dalian and Suzhou, by Chinese city standards, are pretty clean, relatively unpolluted, and in most cases not as congested (especially Dalian). Bear in mind that the words "by Chinese city standards" are important here...pretty much ALL Chinese cities have more pollution and crowding than you'll see back home. However, it's very easily possible to do MUCH worse than Dalian or Suzhou on these scores...

On to resumes...
I hope I can impress on people that when applying for teaching jobs in China, you can forget most of the rejection anxiety experienced in Western job hunts. Other than true international schools that cater to the children of upscale expats, almost no schools in China require teaching-specific education, certification, or experience. Quite a number of them will be tickled silly if you come from North America, Australia/New Zealand, or Western Europe; are some sort of mammal; and made it up the stairs for the interview. Most schools now require you to have a college degree, but this is only because the residence-permit-issuing bureaus require it- not because they care themselves.

The sad fact is that most curricula, especially EFL curricula, are pretty poor- even in universities. Most schools simply want a (preferably attractive and white) foreign face they can put in front of classes and keep the tuition money rolling in. This doesn't mean that you can't do any good as a teacher, of course, but this will most likely come from you personally, not from your employer. Most programs don't really value academics and themselves aren't "real", so they won't really care if you're a "real teacher" or not.
Most schools just want a short-term profit.
Most students just want entertainment that will lead to a shiny piece of paper.

Relax. agagagagag

If you're really wanting to get all Paper Chase  about teaching and education and academics, China may well not be the place for you unless you're keen to wage a very uphill battle you're inevitably going to lose. Try Western Europe or the Middle East, or stay home and get a teaching credential and work in schools there. In China you're going to find a helluva lot of dysfunctional wankers, a core element of decent teachers who work hard and try their best to do good things in the classroom (but may also be dysfunctional wankers agagagagag ), and a small but shrill lot who take themselves and their work WAAAAY too seriously to the edification of almost no one but themselves (and are usually seriously  dysfunctional wankers uuuuuuuuuu ).
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)