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Author Topic: Camera Buying  (Read 24942 times)

Dex

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #45 on: November 15, 2010, 07:36:31 AM »
I went for the Canon G10. Fancy and pricy (well, not that pricy).

Has all the features of most worthy SLRs but feels like a large compact camera. Sweet. It produces fine pics but has a shutter problem (it sticks). Nothing a little Chinaman couldn't fix I'm sure.
Train + China + Spring Festival = Torture

xwarrior

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #46 on: November 15, 2010, 12:29:56 PM »
Hi Dex. I see the G10 has a built-in lens cover. I once had an Asahi Pentax with the same system ... and they do give problems.

I found that I could solve the problem by tapping gently (very) on the cover leaves while powering up.

You are not the only one having this problem with a G10 and a review notes:

Quote
Survivability

The Canon G10 has the same 2 weak points as most other compacts: the lens erection system, and the little plastic blades at the front of the lens which form a dust barrier.

Many compact cameras suffer from lens erection and retraction problems as they age. I had no problems with unintended erection while carried in my pocket; the power switch is well designed. Many other cameras turn on accidentally while in my pocket, and harm themselves trying to extend their lenses while confined.

The little plastic lens barrier blades on many compact cameras get stuck partially open, or partially closed, over time. When this happens, you either get black bars over your pictures (barrier stuck partially closed), or have an unprotected lens when put away (blades stuck partially open.

I doubt the G10 is any better than other cameras here.

** I know you do not have an "erection" problem, even 'unintended' ones,  uuuuuuuuuu but the other problem may be relevant.  bfbfbfbfbf


 
I have my standards. They may be low, but I have them.
- Bette Midler

Dex

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #47 on: November 17, 2010, 07:34:55 AM »
Cheers XW

I'll try to tapping thing - usually I have to manually shift up/down the actual shutters. I'm sure it can be fixed in China. Usually for a pittence too.
Train + China + Spring Festival = Torture

seamallowance

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #48 on: November 18, 2010, 02:04:36 AM »
Cheers XW

I'll try to tapping thing - usually I have to manually shift up/down the actual shutters. I'm sure it can be fixed in China. Usually for a pittence too.

I always keep my Canon SD600 camera in my pants pocket, always leave my pants on the floor and now I stepped on my camera when I got up to pee in the middle of night. llllllllll

Now, the display is busted. Yes, I can buy another of the same camera for about 450 RMB, but if a camera can be repaired for a "pittance", I wanna know about such a place.

(Oh, and when you wrote "manually shift up/down the actual shutters", I thought you were referring to something else...)

teacheraus

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #49 on: November 18, 2010, 02:20:16 AM »


Now, the display is busted. Yes, I can buy another of the same camera for about 450 RMB, but if a camera can be repaired for a "pittance", I wanna know about such a place.


I think that you will probably find tht it is cheaper to go buy a new camera than to get it fixed.
I had a similar problem on a laptop once and it was significantly cheaper to buy a new computer than to get the screen fixed.

I think the screens are easily the most vulnerable part of digital cameras making me very happy that the new camera I recently bought came with a hard protective case
Sometimes it seems things go by too quickly. We are so busy watching out for what's just ahead of us that we don't take the time to enjoy where we are. (Calvin and Hobbs)

Dex

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #50 on: November 19, 2010, 07:15:48 AM »
I'll surely let you know if I find such a place (maybe you're right).
Train + China + Spring Festival = Torture

Leon Purvis

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #51 on: June 07, 2011, 09:55:33 AM »
I'm looking for a much smaller camera these days.(Presently shooting with a Canon 50D). The Canon Powershot SX30 looks good. Much smaller than a DSLR but has all of the functions of one (except the lens isn't removable) PLUS it has video. Presently going for $399.99 at B&H. B&H will ship internationally, but you can buy one in China for nearly the same price that you'd pay to have it shipped from the U.S..

Here's a link:

http://www.bhphotovideo.com/c/product/734782-REG/Canon_4344B001_PowerShot_SX30_IS_Digital.html
I count my blessings when I consider the plight of the boneless chicken.

xwarrior

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #52 on: June 07, 2011, 11:18:43 AM »
The Canon Powershot SX30 looks totally similar to the Canon Powershot S3Is (12x and 6mp) I have had for 4 years - except it has more of everything.

After skimmming through a couple of reviews I can make a few comments based on my experiences with the S3Is ... and my prejudices.

SIZE: Cnet says the SX30 is big and clunky. No problem - I like a camera that looks and can be gripped like a 'real' camera. Advantage is that is smaller than the SLD's and I carry it on top of other junk in my general purpose shoulder bag.

LCD: It is small and not that bright. But 99% of the time I use the view finder on a camera anyway. The fact that you can change the vari-angle LCD to many positions is a real plus in some unusual situations that I will not go into.  ababababab

ZOOM: I do not care what others say but I reckon that even with a good auto-stabiliser anything over 10x zoom needs a tripod. Most photos I take in China do not need more than 12x zoom because if you are any further away something is going to get get in the way --- including a lot of polluted and dust-laden air.I reckon that you can reckon on getting camera shake sometimes ... the auto-stabiliser is good but over 10x the shot becomes problematic 

MACRO: It is really quite good - use it a lot

ISO: This is a real problem - anything over 400 on a Canon seems to produce a lot of noise. From what I have read the SX30 has the same problem. It is a very real problem at times in China.

AUTO FOCUS: Generally ok - but sometimes, when ripping off a shot, it gets confused

BATTERY: I can use rechargeable 4 x AA batteries on mine and I am real happy with that. I can take heaps of photos (700+ with 2500's ... I have done that on a Sports Day ). If needed (so far, never) I can change batteries and keep shooting. I think the dedicated battery of the SX30 will be a limitation.     

VIDEO: I did not buy the camera for video (better to get video camera for that) but to me the video function is great. Takes real good clear video with great sound. Got a real surprise

PHOTOS: This is the real problem area with a Canon. While the photos are generally ok they produce soft images with the odd minor technical problem. Colour is thereabouts but it is not easy to get the skin tones exactly and consistently right for Chinese people (in my opinion).
I read once that Canon persists with a not-so-great programme for JPEG conversion and this is the source of the problem. Video conversion, on the other hand, uses a good programme so that accounts for the difference.

OVERALL: If I wanted real sharp, clear and accurate photos I would go back to Asahi Pentax. I bought the Canon because it was totally multi-purpose and, by and large, I am happy with the way it has performed.
While I would like to have sharper photos Chinese girls find them scary (show every blemish etc) so the softer look is ok for portraits . . . so in a way that is a plus.
         



 

 
I have my standards. They may be low, but I have them.
- Bette Midler

Stil

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #53 on: August 26, 2012, 06:21:30 AM »
After getting some complaints at home that I wasn't sending many pictures, I decided to buy a decent camera. For the last few years I'd been using my camera phone, which while decent gives you no control and is only useful in really good light.

I have never kept up with the changes in the camera market so it was time to do a little research.

It seems that in the last couple of years a new breed of consumer camera has been developed. They are called mirrorless cameras.

Theres a form factor called Micro 4/3 and Sony makes a NEX series of models.

These cameras have very good sensors, interchangeable lenses, all the control settings of the standard DSLRs but are the fraction of the size. They will even work with old legacy lenses from other manufactures with an adaptor. When I head back to Canada, I'll be able to grab my fathers's old Nikon film camera manual lenses and use them. He passed away in 1999, this will be a thrill for me.

With a 'pancake' lens (I don't have one... yet), they are coat pocketable if not pants pocketable (cargo pants excepted) but even if not as pocketable as the point and shoot cameras today, they are light and unobtrusive to carry around. Besides I always have my phone camera if all I want is a pocket camera.

I chose the Sony NEX 5N for about 4000 rmb with a kit lens 18-55mm and it's been great. I can take it everywhere.

Here's a couple of iPhone photos of it with a cigarette pack for size.






I'm now trying to learn how to take good pictures and it's reminding me of learning a language. There are all the technical aspects like aperture, ISO, shutter speed in order to get good exposure but no matter how much you study and learn from reading, there's no substitute for practice and the feeling/art of it. Much like language, no?

Night with the BBQ boss. No flash.




Midday sun




Morning




Indoors




It can be hard to tell with the stepped-down photos on the forum but the pictures are really nice.


If you are looking to buy a new camera, check into these.

George

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #54 on: August 26, 2012, 09:55:40 AM »
Nice shots, Stil. I'll have to look into this. How big can you blow-up? How many megapixels?
The higher they fly, the fewer!    http://neilson.aminus3.com/

Stil

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #55 on: August 26, 2012, 10:59:39 AM »
16.1 Megapixles. There is a Sony NEX 7 at 24 MP. The sensors are top notch so it's purely about the quality of the lenses and since you can use pretty much any lens (with adaptor), the quality is  very high.

Here are some reviews

http://mansurovs.com/sony-nex-5n-review

http://www.dcresource.com/reviews/sony/nex5n-review




.

Fozzwaldus

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #56 on: August 26, 2012, 10:59:49 AM »
 agagagagag

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KA5II5AlO7w

I think Stil should start a thread on gadget shopping in Chiner.
两只老外, 两只老外,跑得快,跑得快,
一个是老酒鬼,一个是老色鬼,真奇怪, 真奇怪

caley1313

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Re: Camera Buying
« Reply #57 on: October 30, 2012, 08:12:31 PM »
I'm a photographer from a former lifetime and these days use the Pentax K5 and K20D coupled with their Limited series of lenses. I highly recommend the lenses if you can get them at a fair price. I, too, own the Canon G10 and it's my favorite walking about camera. I took it with me in 2010 to Mianyang and it took some wonderful images and especially in good light. I recollect that the Pentax lenses cost a fair penny when I was last in China, so I delayed my purchases until I returned stateside. Ended up saving several hundred dollars on the Limited series of lenses. FWIIW, I'll be heading to Ningbo in February with my wife for a year of teaching at a local uni and would love to get out on photo junkets with any and all. We'll be in touch.
Carpe Diem, mi amigo, or...Seize the Big Fish as they say here in Carolina