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Author Topic: What's Fer Dinner?  (Read 24878 times)

Lotus Eater

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #15 on: May 05, 2007, 03:02:08 PM »
My Chengdu friend doesn't like Xi'an food - because it has loads of garlic.  Apparently in Chengdu they ask you if you want garlic, In Xi'an they ask how much la jiao you want.  Different places, different tastes.

I go for BOTH la jiao and garlic!! (So I smell all round if I go to hotpot!!)  ahahahahah aoaoaoaoao

contemporarydog

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #16 on: May 06, 2007, 07:43:52 AM »
One thing that has always confounded me is how much the Chinese, generally, seem to hate onions.
It is too early to say.

Lotus Eater

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #17 on: May 06, 2007, 07:55:26 AM »
Not in Xi'an.  Huiguorou can be ordered as basically onion, bacon and la jiao.  Or you can order the potato version.

Raoul F. Duke

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #18 on: May 06, 2007, 05:54:04 PM »
Interesting...I see onions in Chinese food all the time, everywhere I go...the regular round onions as well as green onions, chives, or leeks. I don't think I've ever seen RAW onion served in a Chinese restaurant, as they are with some Western foods, but I see onions cooked into lots and lots of dishes.

Meanwhile.

I was treated to an evening at one of Suzhou's Yanbian restaurants the other night. A student is from there, had a birthday, and took his girlfriend and I out for dinner there. If you don't know Yanbian, it's a fairly large "autonomous region" in far northeastern Jilin province, along the North Korean border. It's people (and food) are predominantly Korean (they speak Korean in the home!), with bits of Chinese, Manchu, and Mongol thrown in.

The best meal I've had in China was in Yanbian. I was banqueted and baijiu'd beyond my wildest dreams there once some years ago.

I came to realize that they were trying to marry me off to one of the local girls.  aoaoaoaoao
I declined.  oooooooooo

But the food is great; should give it a look sometime. Note that these restaurants are pretty widespread across China. Most of these won't say "Yanbian" anywhere in either Chinese or English; they simply call them "Korean restaurants" in order to suck in the non-Yanbian Chinese who think they're getting foreign food and won't know the difference either way.  uuuuuuuuuu But ask around, or ask your local Korean restaurants if they have Yan4 Bian2 Cai4. One giveaway: Korean barbecue cooked on skewers using wire racks over a bed of charcoal instead of the iron plate thingies. Yanbian barbecue is served with a plate of what loooks like heavily-spiced bread crumbs and sesame seeds...after cooking the meat, it's plunged into a coating of this stuff. Really wonderful!

In addition to assorted barbecues, we had things like:

Huang2 Gua1 Ban4 Jin1 Zhen2 Gu1- a sort of cold salad/relish featuring cucumber and straw mushrooms with onion and garlic, in a sort of dressing with lots of chili peppers. FIERY hot but cool and piquant...a great counterbalance to the barbecue.

Yanbian kimchee is very different from mainstream Korean kimchee, but it rocks. For one thing, it has quite a bit of potato in it. For another, it's not nearly as hot as other kimchee. The Chinese word for Yanbian kimchee is La4 Bai2 Cai4 Chao3 Tu3 Dou4 Pian4.

One interesting option on the barbecue...thin slices of the extremely fatty layered pork so beloved in China, laced onto a skewer at each end. This kind of pork can range from tolerable to disgusting in other dishes, but as barbecue with the bread crumbs it was outstanding. Ask the waiter for Wu3 Hua1 Rou4.

Jack assured me, with a gleam in his eye, that our restaurant had real authentic Yanbian cold noodles just like back home. An enormous bowl of extremely long, rather gelatinous wheat noodles is served in a clear ice-cold dark-brown somewhat gazpacho-like soup, with bits of meat, egg, and vegetables in it and some ice floating on the top. Admittedly, it looks like the bowl the waiter was using to empty dirty dishes from another table, but the taste is superb- especially the soup. When summer strikes I may be eating this for dinner about 5 nights a week. The name is simple and straight-up: Leng3 Mian4.

Great food worth the hunt!  bfbfbfbfbf
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Vegemite

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #19 on: May 07, 2007, 01:23:35 PM »
We get lots of onions up here, too - and even raw onions.
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Lotus Eater

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #20 on: May 08, 2007, 02:37:14 AM »
We also get bowls of raw garlic on the tables in some of the noodle restaurants.  But I really like the pickled garlic that accompanies the yang rou pao mo.  I usually eat all of mine, then ask for another bowl.   And Xiao Fei Yang hotpot makes a great broth with garlic bulbs - and again I usually ask for an extra dose - and it is happily supplied.

Vegemite

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #21 on: May 08, 2007, 05:42:22 AM »
Mongolren also love raw garlic...so we get it not only with the noodles but also with the pies.
And, yeah, pickled garlic is hen hao chi
"I said, "Do you speak-a my language?"
He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich"

Raoul F. Duke

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #22 on: May 09, 2007, 10:55:44 AM »
Please don't banter in the Library. Please.  llllllllll
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

babala

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #23 on: May 10, 2007, 10:15:13 AM »
Raoul,
      That recipe you mentioned about the cucumbers/roast lamb/tomato and onion sounds great. You mentioned mixing the cucumbers and yogurt with local spice. Errrr what is local spice?
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Raoul F. Duke

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #24 on: May 12, 2007, 05:55:24 PM »
It's different in every locale.  uuuuuuuuuu

Usually some mix of cumin, mint, chili pepper, street dirt, and hashish.  agagagagag
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

kcanuck

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #25 on: June 25, 2007, 11:30:32 PM »
Jiaozi- a (sort of )step by step guide

filling-this is beef with celery, garlic, soya sauce and spices


dough-flour and water


sections of dough rolled into rope like shape and small pieces are pinched off


pieces are lightly coated with flour


piece is rolled from the inside out to a paper thin thickness leaving a small 'bump' of dough in the middle (easier said than done)


filling is placed in flattened dough and 'pinched' tightly






there are different pinching techniques


jiaozi are ready for boiling

« Last Edit: June 25, 2007, 11:38:56 PM by kcanuck »
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George

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #26 on: June 25, 2007, 11:38:32 PM »
Quote
Usually some mix of cumin, mint, chili pepper, street dirt, and hashish.  toast

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teleplayer

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #27 on: July 01, 2007, 03:35:05 AM »
Yeah,it's time for the Kcanuk Cooking Show!
Thanks for the demo
Bon Apetite!

Now, I assume the filling is sauteed
Do you boil in one water? More? Isn't this the dish where one keeps adding cold water to insure that w/heat up the dumpling cooks through?

Do they float when done....like a Hushpuppy?




dragonsaver

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #28 on: July 01, 2007, 04:51:13 AM »
No, the filling isn't sauteed it is put into the dough raw and cooked in boiling water.  Yes you add cold water but don't change water. After it boils you add more cold water and when it boils again cold again and then the 3rd time it is ready to eat.
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ericthered

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Re: What's Fer Dinner?
« Reply #29 on: July 01, 2007, 07:09:10 AM »
Quick question: I have tried to make dumplings a few times and I always m'kay up the dough. I have been told that I can use filo pastry instead of homemade dough. Any opinions/suggestions/mocking comments about how I can get dough wrong dddddddddd
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