• Home
  • Search
    •  
  • Login
    • Username: Password:

      Did you miss your activation email?

Author Topic: The Cook Book  (Read 80279 times)

cheekygal

  • Limboid
  • Posts: 3511
The Cook Book
« on: April 25, 2007, 01:22:49 PM »
Here. Share your recipes. The ones you invented/adjusted/adapted in China. Yummy things that you can make out of nothing.

kcanuck

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 903
  • Canadian Stop Sign
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #1 on: April 25, 2007, 01:48:44 PM »
Singapore Noodles

cold, thin noodles, cooked al dente

mix 1/4c soy sauce, 1/4 rice vinegar (haven't found that up here yet, using regular)
2tbsp. brown sugar and a few dashes of hot sauce, stir, let sit

in wok fry in oil:
1 tbsp. minced garlic
1 tbsp. minced ginger
1 tbsp. curry powder
thinly sliced onions and red or green pepper

fry for a minute or so, add noodles and fry for another 5 minutes (or so) the longer the crispier the noodle.
slowly add sauce mixture and keep frying until sauce is absorbed and noodles have a fried (not wet) appearance. I like to keep frying till noodles aren't mushy.

bon appetit
I am still learning. Michelangelo

ericthered

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 6498
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #2 on: July 12, 2007, 11:31:58 AM »
Nanchang Rice

Boil some sticky white rice. Put to the side to cool off.
deseed and finely chop chili peppers (I usually limit myself to four huge red ones).
Chop ginger, spring onions, scallions, spinach, leek. Stir fry these, season with chili sauce, salt and pepper.. Put to the side.
Take three eggs, make them into scrambled eggs.
Cut a chunk of tofu into thin slivers and marinade them in a mixture of chicken stock, salt and pepper, crushed garlic and scallions. Drain the liquid after 30 minutes, keeping about one cup of the marinade. Fry tofu. Mix with veggies, then mix with eggs, mix with rice, and then add the cup of stock. Serve. Spicy, delicious and healthy. 
"Anyone who lives within their means suffers from a lack of imagination." Oscar Wilde.

"It's all oojah cum spiffy". Bertie Wooster.
"The stars are God's daisy chain" Madeleine Bassett.

Lotus Eater

  • Limboid
  • Posts: 7691
  • buk-buk..b'kaaaawww!
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #3 on: July 12, 2007, 04:09:10 PM »
Toast some non-sweet bread. Butter and add vegemite.  Scramble some eggs, place on top of vegemited toast, add a layer of real cheese - blue, smoked etc over it.  Toast under the grill - and eat believing in heaven!

Vegemite

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 387
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #4 on: July 13, 2007, 01:32:37 AM »
Toast some non-sweet bread. Butter and add vegemite.  Scramble some eggs, place on top of vegemited toast, add a layer of real cheese - blue, smoked etc over it.  Toast under the grill - and eat believing in heaven!

What a waste of vegemite! The ideal recipe is just get a hunk of bread and smear it with vegemite and top it with a lettuce leaf. Get rid of all that other junk!
"I said, "Do you speak-a my language?"
He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich"

Lotus Eater

  • Limboid
  • Posts: 7691
  • buk-buk..b'kaaaawww!
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #5 on: July 13, 2007, 01:35:03 AM »
I was trying for haute cuisineahahahahah

I'd normally just do the bread, butter and vegemite.  No lettuce. Simple is best.

Vegemite

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 387
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #6 on: July 13, 2007, 01:40:00 AM »
I was trying for haute cuisineahahahahah

I'd normally just do the bread, butter and vegemite.  No lettuce. Simple is best.

Well, the lettuce was my touch of haute cuisine ahahahahah

I would normally just do the bread and vegemite.
"I said, "Do you speak-a my language?"
He just smiled and gave me a vegemite sandwich"

Raoul F. Duke

  • Lovable Rogue
  • Despot in Absentia
  • *****
  • Posts: 9572
  • "Be specific if you order the mushrooms!"
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #7 on: July 13, 2007, 04:27:25 AM »
This is an on-topic thread for recipes adapted to or developed in China.
"Vicodin and dumplings...it's a great combination!" (Anthony Bourdain, in Harbin)

"Here in China we aren't just teaching...
we're building the corrupt, incompetent, baijiu-swilling buttheads of tomorrow!" (Raoul F. Duke)

gonzo

  • Limboid
  • Posts: 1133
Cookbook TEMP
« Reply #8 on: July 23, 2007, 10:30:18 AM »
You'll need one of them little toaster ovens. I could get all these ingredients easily in Shanghai. Some of you might have to improvise on the mozarella front, but chicken breasts are dirt cheap in markets.You can pretty much get a chicken Parma at every pub in Australia, but this home made version will be a lot better - trust me!
Ingredients (serves 6)

    * 6 chicken breast fillets
    * 1 eggplant
    * 2 tablespoons olive oil
    * 60g butter
    * 425g can chopped Roma tomatoes
    * 250g mozzarella cheese, thinly sliced
    * 150g baby spinach leaves [or other greens], to serve

Method

   1. Preheat oven to 200°C. Place chicken into a ceramic, ovenproof dish.
   2. Thinly slice eggplant lengthways. Heat oil and butter in a non-stick frying pan over high heat. Cook eggplant, in batches, for 2 to 3 minutes each side or until tender and golden. Transfer to a plate lined with a paper towel.
   3. Place eggplant over chicken. Spoon over tomatoes. Top with mozzarella. Bake for 20 to 25 minutes or until cheese is golden and chicken is cooked through. Serve warm with baby spinach leaves.
RIP Phil Stephens.
No static at all.

Acjade

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #9 on: August 08, 2007, 01:58:16 PM »
FRIED RICE/ CHAO MI FAN (CHOW ME FAN)

A LEFTOVER POTFUL OF COOKED RICE.

TWO CHINESE SIZED SCALLIONS (ABOUT FOUR AUSSIE-SIZED SPRING ONIONS)

ABOUT A CUP OF ANY COOKED MEAT YOU HAVE ON HAND AND/OR 2 EGGS (OR NOT, AS AS YOU PREFER).

A PINCH OF SALT AND A PINCH OF MSG

HEAT THE WOK AND TWO TBL.SPS OF OIL UNTIL A THIN BLUE SMOKE RISES. ADD WELL BEATEN EGGS LACED WITH SALT AND COOK AS IF COOKING AN OMLETTE. WHEN WELL DONE REMOVE FROM WOK AND ADD A BIT MORE OIL (ABOUT A TABLESPOON) AND THEN THE RICE. PUSH RICE DOWN AND REMOVE ANY LUMPS. MAKE SURE THE RICE IS THOROUGHLY TURNED UP, AROUND AND OVER. IT TAKES ABOUT TEN MINUTES ON AN ELECTRIC HOTPLATE. LESS ON A FLAMMING GAS JET. THE SECRET IS TO PUSH DOWN, FLIP OVER, TURN AND REPEAT.

ADD THE MEAT AND CONTINUE STIRRING, FROM THE BOTTOM, AROUND, UP AND OVER. TOSS IN THE MSG AND KEEP THE STIRRING MOTION. FINALLY ADD THE CHOPPED OMLETTE AND THE CHOPPED SCALLIONS. MIX AND SERVE.

GOES GREAT WITH A DISH OF TOMATOES AND EGGS. ( NEXT POST)

Acjade

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #10 on: August 08, 2007, 02:07:22 PM »
Shi hongse jidan / tomatoes and eggs.

two eggs

three tomatoes

one green capsicum

a pinch of salt

a pinch of MSG

a tablespoon of oil

Method:

Heat the pan and oil and add the diagonally sliced capsicum. Remove and add the beaten eggs and the salt. Remove and add the chopped tomatoes. When the tomatoes begin to soften combine with the capsicum and the eggs and add the MSG.
« Last Edit: August 08, 2007, 02:09:16 PM by Acjade »

Acjade

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #11 on: September 03, 2007, 10:18:07 AM »
Mummy's treats using left over Jioazi wrappings.

Bananas {or fruit in the fruitbowl}

Yogurt/ cream/ icecream

Chop bananas to size and wrap. Heat oil until a thin smoke arises and then fry until golden.  Serve with grated dark Doves chocolate bar on top of chosen creamy dressing.

Mr Nobody

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 1532
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #12 on: September 20, 2007, 03:10:26 AM »
This is modified from another thread. The reason why I put it here is that this book has some great stuff in it on how to do things I normally buy, but can't here in China, or for things I don;t know the name of, it has pics, etc.

Cooking, a commonsense guide. (no author, but murdoch press)

It has the meat cuts, plus how to make everything from scratch. A guide for the compleat idiot, but when doing things like making basics such as flaky pastry, marmalades, pickled onions etc or pasta or gnocchi or stocks and such, which I never had to do back in Oz, I need an idiot's guide. Plus it pictures the herbs, vegies, etc so I can ask the wife, wassis in Chinese, and try to get it, for example brown onions or "american" or "French" beans (they call them american beans here, french in Oz, dunno why). All the tools and implements, too, like a bread knife. It;s been a big help. The paper is also food-resistance and wipeable as long as not too wet or oily, and spiral bound so it stays open flat.

I use the net for other things such as I am going to be making sausages soon, which I haven;t done before either. MMM real sausages. And I am going to try to replicate my mum's world famous profiteroles. O(K, not world famous, but better than anywhere else I have tried)

Anyway, it's a big help. Mum sent it when I started complaining about the lack of basics.
Just another roadkill on the information superhighway.

Acjade

  • Barfly
  • *
  • Posts: 1113
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #13 on: September 29, 2007, 04:42:07 AM »
Braise Pork Belly with Chilli, Ginger and Pineapple Rice

3 tblsps. cooking wine
2tblsps. veg.oil
2tsps chilli flakes
1/2tsp. ground allspice
1/2 tsp. ground coriander1/4tsp. ground cinnamon
2tblsps. brown sugar
1/2 tsp. salt
2kg. pork belly (skin removed)
1tblsp. rice viegar
1tblsp. grated ginger
1 cup beef stock
1 cup Jasmine rice
2 long red chillis
100g pineapple finely diced
2 large handfuls  coriander leaves


Combine the wine, 1 tblsp. oil, spices, sugar and salt. Rub all the pork and marinate for half an hour.

Remove the pork from the marinade, reserving the marinade. In a large cast-iron casserole dish, heat the remaing oil over high heat and brown the pork.Reduce the heat to low and and add the reserve d marinade, rice vinegar, ginger and stock. Cover with a lid and simmer for two hours, stirring occassionally until the sauce becomes thick and syrupy and the pork tender.

Cool the rice. Remove pork from dish and cut into thick slices and pour the sauce over the sliced pork. Mix the chilli, pineapple and coriander leaves through the rice and serve.

dragonsaver

  • Global Moderator
  • *****
  • Posts: 4445
Re: The Cook Book
« Reply #14 on: September 29, 2007, 06:01:28 AM »
Where do you buy cooking wine?  In the Chinese grocery stores back home they have lots of it but I can't find it anywhere in China.  I ended up buying a cheap bottle of red wine but it isn't the clear (white) cooking wine I use back home. 
Be kind to dragons for thou are crunchy when roasted and taste good with brie.