Raoul's China Saloon (V4.0 Beta)

The Bar Room => The BS-Wrestling Pit => Topic started by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 06:01:58 AM

Title: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 06:01:58 AM
Retiring in China is probably never going to happen. Let's face it, the country is mean in that respect. To stay, you have to work, or be worth a mint. You can't just swan about pouring your meager pension monies into their economy. But we're all long term travelers anyway and can probably cope with being expats til we die. That is, if there were somewhere to retire to...

The top seven budget destinations (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/kathleen-peddicord/best-budget-destinations_b_3943088.html) (1,200USD/7000RMB/per month) are supposedly:

1. Cayo, Belize
2. Cebu, Philippines
3. Cuenca, Ecudor
4. Geogetown, Malaysia
5. Ganada, Nicaragua
6. Medellin, Colombia
7. Pedasi, Panama


I think after China I could live in Belize, the Philippines, or Malaysia. And I say that not having been to any of the countries on the list. South America just doesn't seem my speed. But then, who knows? Just thinking of getting out of this dump and going somewhere interesting for a new and nicer life is lifting my spirits. And it might actually happen too!

So, what is a good place to retire?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 06:20:49 AM
Also,

International Living's Annual Global Retirement Index 2014 (http://internationalliving.com/2013/12/the-2013-global-retirement-index-how-its-scored/)

(http://internationalliving.com/wp-content/blogs.dir/1/files/2013/12/RETIREMENT-INDEX20141.jpg)

Presumably, higher scores means better.


Now in New & Improved Picturescope via HuffPo (http://www.huffingtonpost.com/internationallivingcom/best-places-to-retire_b_4536719.html).
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: kitano on February 27, 2014, 06:45:03 AM
I really fancy living in South America but my wife isn't keen

Retirement is still a long way off for me mind unless I do ever finish my novel(which is sure to be a hit...)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 07:45:28 AM
Other supposedly cheap, but not necessarily livable, places include:

25 of the World's Cheapest... (http://list25.com/25-of-the-worlds-cheapest-places-to-live/)


Not entirely sure how cheap Kiev is anymore. Financially, probably very, but politically...
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 07:52:02 AM
CBS has a slightly different list:

The world's most affordable places to retire (http://www.cbsnews.com/media/the-worlds-most-affordable-places-to-retire-57590476/)

Cebu, Philippines
Chiang Mai, Thailand
Cuenca, Ecuador
Granada, Nicaragua
Hoi An, Vietnam
El Poblado, Medellin, Colombia


I want to stop working.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: KeyserSoze on February 27, 2014, 10:56:05 AM
See you on the coast in Thailand or the Philippines.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Noodles on February 27, 2014, 12:06:19 PM
I'm heading to Malaysia when i eventually leave here.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Day Dreamer on February 27, 2014, 12:34:52 PM
Money is one thing. There are also a million other factors to consider and which is important to you. For example, Thailand makes it real easy for people to retire there.

Me? hmmm, hadn't really given it too much thought. If I was single, probably Cuba or Bahamas. With the g/f, I'm thinking Bermuda or Mexico
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 27, 2014, 01:03:36 PM
I don't know what Thailand's like outside of Bangkok. Fairly rural? I have no idea. I had a few weeks in central Bangkok and decided it was essentially an overgrown country town. But great for food.

Ideally, I'd like a beach. And a view. And restaurants. About the last thing I like is cooking for myself. There has to be good, cheap, simple restaurants. Thailand has those, I know. I think probably Asia is where I'll stay. I could see myself in Europe, maybe. The Americas is another adventure and it might work well, but the prospect is more immediately daunting than it is retiring.

I grew up near the ocean (on the edge of a city that might reasonably be called a giant suburb, which I still find claustrophobic every time I visit, it's clean and varied but somehow spartan and empty, though the water is great and the air far more expansive than here), and wouldn't mind living near water again. But modern communications infrastructure at least is important to me, as is some ability to get around by myself.

So, things to see, a place to eat, some hot sun and humidity, some water, and some high speed internet. And something to do.

I'm 46. I probably have to work another twenty years.

But I was actually thinking, I could go do all this right now. If you really can do this on about 1200USD a month, I could kick back for a year or three. I'd be broke after that, but perhaps a rich lady would marry me for my wealth of knowledges.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on February 28, 2014, 04:31:02 AM
The other question too is, do you horde enough money to retire completely and then go to these destinations or do you horde enough to go there are set up a retirement? That is, make your bundle in some other place then jet off to balmy vistas or do you look upon the balmy vistas as your final place of work? Pretty much all those places listed have English as a second language, and need teachers or managers. The systems there are likely more professionally exacting than here, and perhaps even much fought over by expats, but maybe one could work there. Maybe.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: gonzo on February 28, 2014, 09:03:33 AM
Going from working to doing no work is a bit of a shock, as I discovered. Ideally, a retirement with one or two days a week of work suits me now. And if that extra money is just icing, it pays for some luxuries such as our 4 weeks in Europe recently.

Personally, I'd go for Turkey. Istanbul is great, but a bit expensive. Malaysia and Sri Lanka both do good expat retirement deals but, like Thailand etc., the weather doesn't suit me. I came across a lot of expat retirees in Penang who said they loved it though.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: piglet on February 28, 2014, 10:44:00 AM
Me and Mr P are retired as many of you know.We decided that working a bit and changing location is the way to go.That way you have something to do,you get accommodation and you travel.That's also why we chose China and Uni.Now after 3 years here trying to find another destination that gives us those things is tricky.Europe is too expensive and doesn't give us apartment,air fare or much salary,I don't like the idea of South America, Mr P can't go to Malaysia. .Costa Rica is full of Americans (no offence)So we may just give up and go back home and squander our savings.We have a good beach there,and nice weather... hmmm maybe the Philippines beckons mmmmmmmmmm
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: AMonk on February 28, 2014, 11:38:07 AM
Money is one thing. There are also a million other factors to consider and which is important to you. ... With the g/f, I'm thinking Bermuda or Mexico

 cfcfcfcfcf
Fairly good health care, and we are accessible to US/Canadian expertise (2-3 hours away by plane).  
Climate is pretty decent, except August/September when we get very humid and the occasional hurricane ventures past.
Language is "English", with Bermudian accent - usually comprehensible to others.
Money is dollar, on par with US.
Cost of living is ... high.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on November 03, 2014, 10:58:44 PM
I'm still 46. I still want to retire. I still don't have enough money and probably never will. asasasasas
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: piglet on November 05, 2014, 09:29:58 AM
We have had one of these threads before.I agree that money is not everything.We are already retired.We came back to Israel after China and found it sooo expensive here.WE can't afford to eat out,go drinking etc whenever we want as we could in China.Here we have to pay more for the car (didn't have one in China) and we don't enjoy it at all.Despite the fact that here we have better theatre,movie choices,shows etc,it doesn't help because I am essentially unemployable (too old) or offered a risible amount per hour.Private lessons are drying up because with the economic situation people are not doing them.The gym is expensive too,so I am getting fat.
So we started investigating Panama, Mexico,Costa Rica or Ecuador.Panama has jobs but not available before you arrive.None of those will offer me a deal even close to what we had in China.So granted you get better internet,but CR is overrrun with Americans,Mexico is reportedly dangerous and Ecuador gets cold.I am not a beach person,so Philippines doesnt' appeal to me and I heard the food is crappy.So we are thinking go back to China till I can't work any more and then think some more.I am currently 57. That gives me 3 more years or so to look for another destination.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on November 05, 2014, 12:21:02 PM
What bothers me about retiring in China is the lack of the good life. Yeah, it's cheap, but it's also dirty, noisy, and frankly, aside from various bits of work I do, uninteresting. More importantly, there's what seems to me a relentless brutalisation. There are a lot of ways in which this country, the people, and the environment are forgiving - it's easy to get a job, simple to be here - but I think this is more a product of happenstance than design. In fact, I think as time goes by and the actual designs become clearer... well, I don't know. I don't know which side will win out. I don't know what historical circumstance would support the better sides of the nation becoming the true character of the nation.

I might be overstating.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: adamsmith on December 02, 2014, 04:18:48 AM
Hi piglet, I have sent you a PM about an immediate position lasting until end of January with good salary. If you don't get the message please let me know.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on December 03, 2014, 01:27:34 AM
The Top 10 Countries for Global Expats (http://skift.com/2014/12/02/the-top-10-countries-for-global-expats/)

The list of popular expat destinations has long included Northern Europe and Switzerland, known for their happiness, famed healthcare programs, and exceptional quality of life.

These countries still retain some of the top spots, but this year the top expat destination belongs to a country in the opposite hemisphere: Ecuador.

The 2014 InterNations Expat Insider survey states that this South American country is becoming a hub for expats looking to take advantage of the financial benefits they can reap there.

Ecuador came in first on the personal finance and cost of living indexes, and it also ranks the highest of all surveyed countries for ease of making friends. About 82% of expats also said they find it easy to settle down and feel at home in Ecuador. The country also ranks first for personal happiness, and 42% of expats living there say the plan to stay “possibly forever.”...



Hmmm... to go from not knowing Chinese to not knowing Spanish....


The new expat fav destination list, possibly mostly for rich people:

1   Ecuador
2   Luxembourg
3   Mexico
4   Switzerland
5   U.S.
6   Singapore
7   Spain
8   Philippines
9   Australia
10   Hong Kong


And lastly, from the article:

For American expats, the top three countries they move to are Germany, Italy and China, and one-third of them are working, with 47% working in a manager-type role.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on November 06, 2015, 07:32:07 AM
So I've started ruminating on this again. I think it's probably Indonesia, Malaysia or the Philippines for me. Kinda pissed off about that, to be honest. I'm sure it'll be great and all, and I'm not sure I'd actually want to retire in China, but what's with the no permanent residence, China? You know why I won't invest here? Because of that, you idiots. And the fact investment here is wildly unpredictable. But if I had some kind of promise, I'd work harder to make something more predictable. As it is, I've started sending what money I have elsewhere. Yeah, China, you took my youth (well, my middle age), but I'm taking my money.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: CWL on November 06, 2015, 07:47:54 PM
I am in the states working on course work.  However, I am currently searching for a position for my return to China.  I plan on possibly teaching in China for 2 to 3 years and then bailing out for good.  I surely don't want to retire in China nor invest in anything in China.  No too long ago, I had dinner with a member of the board of directors at my last school.  He was telling me I should buy a house in China as an investment towards retirement.  I just laughed.  He asked why I was laughing.  I told him I would continue to invest in my retirement portfolio in the U.S. instead of buying an over priced place in China.  After he asked me a few questions about my investments, he stopped with that buy a house shit with me as an investment.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Latino on November 15, 2015, 08:38:46 AM
.
We have had one of these threads before.I agree that money is not everything.We are already retired.We came back to Israel after China and found it sooo expensive here.WE can't afford to eat out,go drinking etc whenever we want as we could in China.Here we have to pay more for the car (didn't have one in China) and we don't enjoy it at all.Despite the fact that here we have better theatre,movie choices,shows etc,it doesn't help because I am essentially unemployable (too old) or offered a risible amount per hour.Private lessons are drying up because with the economic situation people are not doing them.The gym is expensive too,so I am getting fat.
So we started investigating Panama, Mexico,Costa Rica or Ecuador.Panama has jobs but not available before you arrive.None of those will offer me a deal even close to what we had in China.So granted you get better internet,but CR is overrrun with Americans,Mexico is reportedly dangerous and Ecuador gets cold.I am not a beach person,so Philippines doesnt' appeal to me and I heard the food is crappy.So we are thinking go back to China till I can't work any more and then think some more.I am currently 57. That gives me 3 more years or so to look for another destination.

My university just hired a 61 year old with no prior teaching experience.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on November 16, 2015, 07:53:53 AM
The purchase price of housing is the one thing that worries me.  Then again, the louder I hear Chinese people say "There's NO bubble in house prices." the more it sounds like 2007 in the USA. ahahahahah

I just hope I can scrape up enough cash to be ready if (when) the bubble pops.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Nolefan on November 16, 2015, 02:59:31 PM
The purchase price of housing is the one thing that worries me.  Then again, the louder I hear Chinese people say "There's NO bubble in house prices." the more it sounds like 2007 in the USA. ahahahahah

I just hope I can scrape up enough cash to be ready if (when) the bubble pops.

I would not touch real estate in China right now with a mile long stick..... more than ever, it's ready to burst. For the last 3 months, the party has sustained the stock market. money is being siphoned out of the country at record speed... just not worth it unless u can buy cheap in tier 4 cities and sell within the month.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 10, 2017, 05:24:34 AM
I come back to this thread about once a year bibibibibi and here I am again. I recently discovered how cheap (relatively speaking) a retirement visa is in Thailand and have started thinking I'll be 50 soon enough why not? Looking into Thailand a bit more it seems like healthcare is better there but internet might be iffy. So I have a retirement wish list. I want:

a beach and/or a city I can explore by bicycle.
at the very least, 1Mbps internet, but I'd prefer 50.
restaurants, street food, variety

Don't give a damn about nightlife and don't need fellow farang, and don't want neighbours. Would like supermarkets. Will leave the country if there are pigeons.

I'm thinking I might have to start visiting some countries. Thailand probably. Malaysia maybe. Vietnam if I have to. Indonesia might be okay. Cambodia?

I just don't think in the end I'm going to be able to return to the homeland, and if I do have to see out my years in China, then I'll consider that a failure of some kind. The pollution and the neighbours are murderous irritants I can cope with while I still have the strength to create countermeasures, but to be an old man swallowed up by this shit would be a grim end. So I'mma have to find some way to go elsewhere.


/staying positive
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: CWL on March 10, 2017, 08:33:08 AM
... but to be an old man swallowed up by this shit would be a grim end.

I hear you.  I left China.  Never really want to live there again.  Currently in Korea but my place of work was caught off guard by the scandals and shipping economy.  I decided to jump ship and have recently accepted a gig in Saigon.  Looking forward to it. 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 10, 2017, 11:33:09 PM
The other question I have is when the doddering does start, what then? The expat life I lead does depend on a certain fund of strength. Curable failings of strength are mostly manageable. But what happens when regimes of daily medicines start to be needed? When regular checkups and doctor consultations become vital to the management of daily life? What happens when I can't skate past difficulties any more?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: CWL on March 11, 2017, 01:50:40 AM
I have been thinking about all of that too.  As a result, I have been working towards acquiring advanced degrees and other enhancers.  Already paying off and should continue to do so.  Also been managing to keep individual retirement investments going back in the states.  Still lots of unknowns and uncertainty. 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Nolefan on March 11, 2017, 04:25:01 AM
as time goes by, we all think about these things, especially if our significant other is not a local.

Going back to my days of studying finance, common wisdom says that before considering retirement, you have to start considering equity. What assets do you own that can be converted to cash if needed? housing, diamonds, gold, whatever...

Where is your cash flow coming from in retirement if you've been away for decades and not part of the social security system? money for food, medicine, life etc? you better have a stash in the bank account and preferably a couple of investments that can return a nice interest rate to allow you to survive.

What good is a retirement visa in Thailand if you have to sustained income?

a bunch of things to think about
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 11, 2017, 10:24:11 AM
Yeah, savings and/or investments are going to be the key.

That said, if I did have enough money to retire to the homeland, I don't think I would. Assuming one is not on the run from the law, living this long as an expat says something about lifestyle preferences. I for one love Australia and all, but living there feels like a chore. I might change my mind as I get older, but I have lived in Adelaide, Sydney and Melbourne already, and visited a few other capitals, and while the air is so clean it's almost harsh in its purity... eh, I don't know. But yeah, if I did have enough money to retire to the homeland, I'd live large in South East Asia instead. Big house, no neighbours, a beach nearby, be discovered one morning by the housekeeper and what do I even care by then, dump my carcass under a tree. This is my fantasy.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on March 17, 2017, 10:35:36 PM
I've been thinking about retirement too. I have absolutely no desire to return to Canada.

At one time Thailand looked like a distinct possibility (I was spending four months a year there). However, I've become disgusted with the country - corruption, sleaze, inflation and Chinese tour groups (nothing against the Chinese... but when they are in a tour group it's mayhem). Safety standards are non-existent; and you take your life in your hands every time you are on the roads - absolute carnage - it doesn't matter if you're driving or not (you can't control the other idiot). Besides, the vast majority of Thais don't like foreigners (tourists are fooled by the 'smiles') and LOS does not mean Land of Smiles, it means Land of Scams. Paradise lost.

Now, I'm looking at the Cambodian Riviera (Sihanoukville) and will go there to check it out this summer. I've been to Kep (nice, but too small) and Kampot (a little bigger, but caters to the young 'backpacker' foreigner). In Cambodia, things are much less expensive than Thailand - i.e. no tax on alcohol & tobacco. While Cambodia has many of the same problems as Thailand, in general the Khmer people are more accepting of foreigners; and, the visa situation is much simpler (less bureaucracy and none of the 'requirements'). I'm going to look at buying a condo, but I think there's a 'bubble' and renting is a better/safer option... a nice little one-bedroom, one bath bungalow with a (shared) pool close to the beach can be had for $400-$500 per month. If you don't want a pool, a nice apartment or condo can be had for 1/2 - 2/3 of that.


Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 18, 2017, 12:31:10 AM
Searching "employment sihanoukville" doesn't immediately come up "teach English!!!" so there's a point in the city's favour.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 18, 2017, 12:40:23 AM
Next search, after looking at apartment options, is bicycles.... if someone's selling middle-of-the-road MTBs there too, well then goddammit I might just go there now
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 18, 2017, 01:43:50 AM
Here's an odd question: I wonder how the healthcare rates relative to China?   ahahahahah
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on March 18, 2017, 04:18:49 AM
Searching "employment sihanoukville" doesn't immediately come up "teach English!!!" so there's a point in the city's favour.

True! There are so many weirdos teaching English in Asia, you want to find a place to retire where they don't make up any significant percentage of the expat community.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 19, 2017, 01:38:56 AM
Turns out...

Thailand bribery rate is worse than Myanmar and Cambodia: survey (http://www.nationmultimedia.com/news/national/30309518)

And that's by how much, you ask.

1%



And all three are about 15% higher than China.  aoaoaoaoao
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on March 19, 2017, 03:02:45 AM
Yeah... and in Thailand a uniform is just a license to practice extortion with impunity. The Immigration supervisor at HKT extorted 2000 baht from me last time I was there. The police don't do anything... except collect 'tea money' at roadblocks (and with the military junta in power, there are roadblocks everywhere now).

If you're Thai 'Hi-So' (high society) you can drive drunk, kill nine people and 'get off' by becoming a monk for a week. If you're a tourist caught feeding the fish, you'll have bail set a 100,000 baht before your tried and found guilty. Koh Tao has become known as "Death Island"... especially for attractive, young, blonde, females. Plus, the lese-majeste laws are the strictest in the world (and the penalties Draconian) - you can't say anything about the new king being a spoiled, stoned, 'rich kid' gangster who'd rather be banging supermodels in Europe (unless you want to spend 30 years in the 'Bangkok Hilton').
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 19, 2017, 05:27:29 AM
So I wonder what awaits the unwary traveler in Cambodia.

I do wonder too what it'll be like as an old man living "outside", no longer sheltered by a (pigeon-infested but otherwise relatively pleasant) university campus.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 25, 2017, 10:00:31 AM
I wish to influence my environment. In China, with the condition I have acquired for myself, the most I can muster is continual complaint. Pigeons, dogs, the endless dumbfuckery of neighbours. Frustration at this kind of condition is getting worse as I age. Ideally in retirement all of this shall fall away. In reality, I going to age really badly, and I think all of these countries just do need a younger man's strength.

Bleh.

Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on March 25, 2017, 10:03:12 PM
...the endless dumbfuckery of neighbours.

That (and 'street noise') are my biggest worries.

The worst was an apartment I had in Korea - hookers, drunks, and the facts: the stairwell/hallways were a marble-tiled 'echo chambers' on the other side of the wall next to my bed (amplifying every clomping, high-heeled footstep to make it seem like they were literally in the room); and every idiot would go into the hallway to 'scream talk' on their phone, made it Hell. 
asasasasas


My uni campus faculty apartment in China is a comparative haven of tranquility. Part of that is just luck - one floor down there's a guy who leaves his door wide open all the time and listens to 'Beijing Opera' (worse than a cat being tortured)/Chinese pop at 120 dB. Apart from the facts: sometimes the upstairs kid(s) start bouncing something on their floor that sounds like its coming through my ceiling... and once a month or so the same people tend to rearrange their furniture at 3:00 AM; and every night at dusk it sounds as though WW3 has started as the Chinese celebrate whatever day of the week it is... and their invention of gunpowder (but that's in the far distance and usually only lasts five or so minutes); and NOBODY in Asia (apart from the odd caucasian) is capable of entering or exiting their apartment without slamming the metal door, it's quiet.
bjbjbjbjbj


I definitely think it's wise, if possible, to rent in the building/neighbourhood before buying. Of course, their are no guarantees (anywhere in the world) because neighbours change.
llllllllll



 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on March 27, 2017, 12:49:28 AM
I wish to influence my environment. In China, with the condition I have acquired for myself, the most I can muster is continual complaint. Pigeons, dogs, the endless dumbfuckery of neighbours. Frustration at this kind of condition is getting worse as I age. Ideally in retirement all of this shall fall away. In reality, I going to age really badly, and I think all of these countries just do need a younger man's strength.

Bleh.

All of us clones here at Lunatic Retirement Estates have heard your complaints.  We've searched the world and have finally found you a place to retire which meets all of your needs:

1.  No dogs.
2.  No pigeons.
3.  No neighbors.

It's a beautiful villa, just 80 km from McMurdo station.  We'll ask the penguins to try to not make too much noise. ahahahahah
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 27, 2017, 04:16:03 AM
(http://i43.tinypic.com/wsrxxf.jpg)
^;;^
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on March 27, 2017, 05:07:47 AM
There is a provision in the lease agreement against digging up large objects buried deep in the ice.  Tenants are also prohibited from bringing back ice blocks containing any unusual frozen organic material.  Also, the harboring of stray sled dogs being pursued by gunmen in a helicopter is strictly forbidden.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on March 27, 2017, 08:33:35 AM
It's a beautiful villa, just 80 km from McMurdo station.  We'll ask the penguins to try to not make too much noise. ahahahahah

That's no good. I've been to Antarctica (twice), and can tell you with absolute certainty penguins are noisy, if fact raucous - so much so, CP will actually appreciate pigeons - and they STINK!
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on March 27, 2017, 09:36:21 AM
It's a beautiful villa, just 80 km from McMurdo station.  We'll ask the penguins to try to not make too much noise. ahahahahah

That's no good. I've been to Antarctica (twice), and can tell you with absolute certainty penguins are noisy, if fact raucous - so much so, CP will actually appreciate pigeons - and they STINK!

Pay no attention to the person who undoubtedly plans to move you into a house filled with pigeons and yappy dogs.  Penguins are fastidiously clean, very quiet, and fully respect the privacy of those who wish to be left alone.  Antarctica is the perfect place for a misanthrope who wants to get away from dogs and pigeons.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 27, 2017, 01:41:08 PM
Here's the thing...
(http://static.rogerebert.com/uploads/review/primary_image/reviews/the-thing-1982/hero_EB19820101REVIEWS201010349AR.jpg)

Antarctica is too cold bpbpbpbpbp
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on March 27, 2017, 10:15:53 PM
Antarctica would be toooooo cold for me, especially with the blood thinners I have to take. bibibibibi I have been retired for 20yrs and I find that my situation suits me. agagagagag I own a small 2 bedroom house on a small block of land. My neighbours are not noisy and there are no children living nearby and no units or townhouses. :dancemj: Whilst I drive my own car, there is a bus stop close by if I need it. The shopping centre is also close. I just go inside my house and close the door and I am in my own world with my TV set and my video recorder. It is an easy drive into the city of Brisbane to go to "the den" where I get free parking. I can just go out the front door of the Casino and can walk down the main city street. I am very happy with my retirement situation and am so glad that I was able to retire early, given that my heart specialist says I will be lucky to have four more years. bfbfbfbfbf Whilst I don' get a pension from the Government, I do get a "Pensioner Concession card". One of the things that this entitles me to receive is cheaper medication.  The full cost of a packet of 28 blood thinner tablets, is $86.64. I only pay $5.30 for these and for each of my other medications. bfbfbfbfbf
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on March 28, 2017, 12:38:17 AM
So Calach wants a dog, pigeon, and noisy neighbor free zone in a climate conducive to the presence of dogs, pigeons, and neighbors.

This does present a dilemma, but we here at Lunatic Retirement Estates will go to great lengths to satisfy even the craziest clients.

How about a small tropical island inhabited only by coconut trees and a very quiet ball named Wilson?  We'll even throw in a pair of ice skates in case you might need them for anything.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 28, 2017, 04:25:59 AM
The deal with all these irritants is stop feeding them. Neighbours, pigeons, dogs. STOP LAYING OUT GARBAGE BANQUETS FOR THEM AT MY DOOR! Riding around I sometimes get the impression everyone does live in garbage. Seemingly intractable piles of litter are to be found everywhere. With the shit that gets strewn around buildings sites, you could say progress in China is built on garbage. Magical tropical paradii such as [nowhere] and [neverwhen] are my final destination. I won't be able to pay for any of it and unless I start making tangible plans soon, I'm not even going, so..........

I expect Cambodia, Laos, Thailand, Burma, all those places, they are strewn with garbage too. Actual human infrastructure barely exists here, I don't see why it would exist in less developed places, but maybe those places are less fucked up too?

I think in China development, which has been good for many, has also, frankly, to be the imperialist for a moment (longer), stripped the place of "charms". Charm, in a poor country, is that simple infrastructure that exists above subsistence farming and below urban development. For example, restaurants can exist, and they'll often be open all hours and all days because the owners are too poor to think of themselves as people who can take time off. That was China ten years ago. That's not China now. Would I genuinely like to go exploit the masses elsewhere for a while and call it retirement? If they have internet then yeah, maybe.

The other strand of this style of think is I don't think I'm going to make it. I'm going to get older, weaker, and less able. I fear and hate that. It'll be like teaching English again.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on March 28, 2017, 09:45:33 PM
Calach, if/as your health deteriorates as you get older, you will need medication and even some one to care for you. bibibibibi I guess that is going to be the main issue to consider. bjbjbjbjbj
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on March 29, 2017, 03:35:58 AM
I'll confess to the occasional fantasy of moving off to some incredibly remote village where I could live like an emperor on my life savings (currently 262 RMB plus $13.38).  The drawback is even if I went so far as to take over and have all of my whims obeyed by a few hundred peasant farmers (and their lovely daughters afafafafaf), the cost of cholesterol meds and a few other things I need to discourage the grim reaper would put me in a financial bind after a few short years.  There's no point in running off to paradise if you get sick a die too quickly there.

Guess I'll have to keep slaving over a hot keyboard a bit longer.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 30, 2017, 12:02:54 AM
Whenever I visit Australia these days I boggle at the facilities for older people they have there now. Aside from actual air that can be breathed, the environment is generally free of mess. Cars move way too fast on the roads, but they all follow a reasonably good order. Buses actually kneel at the curb to let older people on. And then there's hospitals, doctors, built up infrastructure, the ability of older people to use, say, walking frames or scooters and get around supermarkets.... it's like some scifi super-future compared to China - clean, bright, cheerful, helpful, and everyone enabled rather than locked away. I don't know for sure that I'll be able to take part in that. I'm still in the Australian Medicare system, but I'm not insured and by now I don't have money enough to make up the shortfall. I hope I end up finding a way out of all this, but I feel like I've chosen to give China too many of my years.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: CWL on March 30, 2017, 04:22:53 AM
Escape while you can. 
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on March 30, 2017, 11:00:32 PM
Calach, as you know, there is plenty of help available in Oz. If you need medical help, you will get it, If it's not urgent, you will join a queue. If it's urgent, you will be taken care of immediately. I am a member of Defence Health, but lots of people don't have any health insurance and are well looked after here. I hope that you can obtain enough information to make the correct decision about your future. bfbfbfbfbf
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on March 31, 2017, 12:10:34 AM
I can't prove it with actual facts, but trying to be a teacher in Australia is like being the kid who puts the Kick Me sign back on. First, there's the laundry list of qualifications required. Second, there's the poor conditions, the overwork, the low status, the fact that qualified teachers actively choose within a few years of graduation to LEAVE THE PROFESSION. Third, even with all that, there's the competition.

This kind of happens everywhere though, I guess. Even in China you get the sense teachers are overgrown children. They have enough money to be lower middle class wannabes, but they have so little actual status they're subject to the most ludicrous of culture bullshits. For instance, teaching young people keeps your heart young.

Teaching isn't a respectable profession. For most, it is glorified child-minding.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on March 31, 2017, 10:12:15 PM
Calach, I wouldn't have the patience to be a teacher. bibibibibi The closest I came was when I was about 18yrs old and I worked as a "governess" on a huge property out in western Queensland; about 60miles from the nearest very small town. My job was to teach two young children by correspondence lessons using the school of the air on the Royal Flying Doctor radio. bibibibibi My observations are that the young people of today have toooooo much money and freedom to say and do things with very few consequences.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on April 01, 2017, 02:34:29 AM
If teaching is working properly, students need your patience only at the beginning. Pretty quickly they acquire some level of ability in what you want them to do, and that serves as a foundation for whatever else it is you want to do next. At some point they become self sustaining and they only need you to add fuel. You just have to watch out for them getting bored or burnt out.

That's the theory anyway. Lots of other mismanagement gets in the way. Other staff, dumbass institutions, overbearing expectation invented by social groups. Teaching and teachers are a strange whipping boy but by golly if lots and lots of people don't like to kick a teacher.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on April 01, 2017, 10:19:25 PM
Calach, do you think that children today have a far different attitude to learning and to teachers, than say you did as a young lad?
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on April 02, 2017, 12:32:53 AM
I don't know. It's been a good 15 years since I took an up-close look at Australian society, and when I was a lad I don't think I was much like my peers. As a student I was always all about the knowledge and getting good grades - the proverbial swot. From maybe university on I started being about managing my own knowledge rather than just getting good grades. (Pretty much failed the second year of uni as a matter of fact.) What I do think though is there is a cherished lie in Australian and probably other societies about how we all value education. We don't. (I might be having some oddball ideas about that. My primary schooling was in the late 70s and secondary in the early 80s. According to my mother, school was a bit weird in those decades. Standards were... off, somehow.) So, in all respects, I don't directly know what kids are up to these days.

But, for instance, I look at current stories like this (School funding divides along class lines as teachers and parents dip into own hip pockets for resources (http://www.abc.net.au/news/2017-04-02/school-funding-shortfall-met-by-teachers-and-parents/8407866)), and find them eminently recognisable. Sausage sizzles, cake raffles, fundraisers of all sorts... that crap has been around since forever and it does tell us something...

Universities don't do that kind of nonsense. (Do they?)
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: cruisemonkey on April 02, 2017, 03:08:04 AM
Universities don't do that kind of nonsense. (Do they?)

No. They have alumni associations... and sleep with corporations while married to the government.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Granny Mae on April 02, 2017, 10:33:01 PM
I sat for my leaving Certificate in 1962; I repeated the year before because I was too young, having started school when I was four. I had six brothers and my family was not wealthy, so I had nothing, particularly nice dresses. As a result, I was a loner and I just got through my schooling whilst making no effort to study. I was very intelligent, but didn't know it until I retired. I keep saying that most young folk today would have found it very hard to survive my teenage years. bibibibibi
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on April 03, 2017, 03:27:28 AM
Universities don't do that kind of nonsense. (Do they?)

No. They have alumni associations... and sleep with corporations while married to the government.

And in the US, they just slap extra fees on top of the tuition - like a big fat fee for the "it'll make us a lot of money in the future" football team and some other fees to help pay for scholarships because so many people can't afford the tuition - because of all the added fees.  bibibibibi
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on April 03, 2017, 05:15:22 AM
I think I'm probably okay with fees. Even high fees. I've never had to pay any so maybe my point of view a bit abstract but paying for a course of study makes sense. What doesn't make sense is paying for a course of study and then on top of that organizing a bake sale to support the institution offering the course. Undoubtedly I am glossing over a range and variety of economic and political issues, but if educational institutions are relying on ad hoc funding that isn't even competitive enough to be a going business concern in its own right..... I think it means education isn't valued.

But it occurs to me I might be talking out of my backside. I mean, if parents are grubbing about baking cakes and manning stalls, then obviously they're committed to some aspect of these institutions. And if this stuff is some ubiquitous as to be almost an institution in its own right, then it's not just some education institutions that are valued in this: it's all of them.

But screw all that noise because I'm pretty sure if education were valued, it wouldn't be industrialized. It'd be a sophisticated institution with lofty standards and goals and it'd have a poop load more substance than it does.


I used to ask students were they considering postgraduate work because they loved their subject. that was always good for a groan.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Escaped Lunatic on April 05, 2017, 02:24:25 AM
As the extra scholarship fees kept piling up, I became more and more convinced that the long term plan at my University was to get Bill Gates to enroll for 1 credit hour per semester, since he's the only one who could afford to provide full scholarships for the other 40,000 or so students at the school.
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: Calach Pfeffer on April 05, 2017, 02:47:01 AM
Is it Norway or Denmark, I forget. The one where they pay teachers a lot of money, there are no exams in high school, and university is free.... and they have the highest national academic results of the developed world
Title: Re: Retirement
Post by: CWL on April 05, 2017, 04:13:29 AM
You might be thinking of Finland.  I believe the so-called "Finnish Miracle" is fading.  It's now the "Singapore Miracle".   ahahahahah

https://www.oecd.org/pisa/pisa-2015-results-in-focus.pdf