What's in the News

  • 2845 replies
  • 499803 views
Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2835 on: July 07, 2021, 07:13:58 PM »
Chinese official declares Beijing has targeted Australian goods as economic punishment

A Chinese official has openly declared that Beijing has singled out Australia for economic punishment, saying the federal government cannot profit from China while "smearing" it.

China's government has hit several Australian industries with economic sanctions, imposing hefty tariffs on Australian barley and wine exports while throwing up barriers to several other products including timber, lobster and coal.

[...]

When he was asked about a drop in Australian agricultural exports to China, Mr Zhao made it clear Beijing had deliberately targeted Australian goods.

"Mutual respect is the foundation and safeguard of practical cooperation between countries," he said.

"We will not allow any country to reap benefits from doing business with China while groundlessly accusing and smearing China and undermining China's core interests based on ideology."...



See now this is respectable.

It's not true, of course. It's far less about Australia than it is about splitting power blocs.

But coming out and announcing a firm moral position? Good for them.

*

Escaped Lunatic

  • *****
  • 10550
  • Finding new ways to conquer the world
    • EscapedLunatic.com
Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2836 on: July 20, 2021, 04:58:22 PM »
The existing high speed trains are great, but they could be even better - like this:

https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202107/1228998.shtml

The world's first high-speed maglev transportation system running at a speed of 600 kilometers per hour will make its public debut in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province, on Tuesday.

Now we just have to see where the new maglev lines get installed.

agagagagag
I'm pro-cloning and we vote!               Why isn't this card colored green?
EscapedLunatic.com

*

kitano

  • *
  • 2566
    • Children of the Atom
Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2837 on: July 21, 2021, 06:00:36 AM »
The existing high speed trains are great, but they could be even better - like this:

https://www.globaltimes.cn/page/202107/1228998.shtml

The world's first high-speed maglev transportation system running at a speed of 600 kilometers per hour will make its public debut in Qingdao, East China's Shandong Province, on Tuesday.

Now we just have to see where the new maglev lines get installed.

agagagagag

That would be much better than the plane as well because you don't have to land and takeoff.

Maglev from Shanghai to London please

*

Escaped Lunatic

  • *****
  • 10550
  • Finding new ways to conquer the world
    • EscapedLunatic.com
Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2838 on: July 21, 2021, 04:36:11 PM »
I saw an article about a proposed high speed train tunnel under the Bering Straight.  Might be fun to take a train from China all the way into the US.  Economy class high speed rail seats are much more generous than economy class airline seats.
I'm pro-cloning and we vote!               Why isn't this card colored green?
EscapedLunatic.com

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2839 on: August 11, 2021, 01:18:18 PM »
China passes US to top output of influential science papers

Academic strength could help further increase nation's industrial dominance

TOKYO -- China has become No. 1 in the output of highly cited natural science papers, a development that could make the country even stronger in terms of industrial competitiveness.

Japan's National Institute of Science and Technology Policy counted the number of academic papers that are ranked among the top 10% in terms of citations and found that China has overtaken the U.S. and become No. 1.

The number of highly cited papers is an important indicator of a country's research strength. The Japanese government affiliate, using data from the British research company Clarivate, counted the number of research publications among major economies and calculated a three-year average for each country.

Within the top 10% of papers cited in natural science fields, China averaged 40,219 between 2017 and 2019, up 5.1 times from 10 years earlier, while the U.S. had 37,124, up 3%.

China accounted for 24.8% of the total, compared with 22.9% for the U.S. and 5.4% for third-placed U.K.

Among papers in the top 10% of citations, China had the largest share in five fields, including 48.4% in materials science, 39.1% in chemistry and 37.3% in engineering. Generally, China has shown strength in academic fields that are close to business and industry. The U.S. excelled in biological fields, with a share of 34.5% in clinical medicine and 26.9% in life sciences.

In terms of the overall number of research papers, China led the U.S. for two straight years.

The U.S. still leads China in the number of "top papers," or those in the top 1% of citations, with a share of 27.2%, versus China's 25%. But China is catching up in this category as well.



And with only 4 times the population too!

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2840 on: August 23, 2021, 02:27:31 PM »
Why a US military base became a centre for Chinese Covid conspiracies

A disinformation campaign claiming that the Covid-19 virus originated from an American military base in Maryland has gained popularity in China ahead of the release of a US intelligence report on the virus origins....


Science!

*

Escaped Lunatic

  • *****
  • 10550
  • Finding new ways to conquer the world
    • EscapedLunatic.com
Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2841 on: August 23, 2021, 08:06:12 PM »
From 30 million cases per year in the 1940's to none.  Eradicating malaria is a long, hard process, but after a number of years of Zero cases, China has officially been recognized as being free of endemic malaria.

https://www.who.int/news/item/30-06-2021-from-30-million-cases-to-zero-china-is-certified-malaria-free-by-who

agagagagag btbtbtbtbt agagagagag
I'm pro-cloning and we vote!               Why isn't this card colored green?
EscapedLunatic.com

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2842 on: September 02, 2021, 02:35:15 PM »
Morgan Stanley thinks Chinese education companies have a way forward despite the crackdown

Beaten-down Chinese education stocks can recover by double-digits as the industry shifts to businesses like vocational training following this summer's regulatory crackdown, Morgan Stanley analysts said.

They upgraded U.S.-listed New Oriental Education & Technology to "overweight" with expectations of 55% gains in the share price, according to an Aug. 29 report.

The analysts expect further government support for vocational training, where they like Hong Kong-listed China East Education and predict gains of nearly 70% ahead....



"Vocational", you say? Hmmm...

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2843 on: September 17, 2021, 06:19:33 PM »
Australia's decades-long balancing act between the US and China is over. It chose Washington

For more than 20 years, Australia tried to maintain good relations with both the United States and China.

It was good for trade and peaceful regional relations. But on Thursday, with the announcement of a new security deal with the United States and the United Kingdom, which will see Australia eventually field nuclear-powered submarines, Canberra made its position clear -- it has chosen Washington over Beijing.

By choosing sides, some experts say Australia has unnecessarily antagonized China, the country's largest trading partner, while at the same time making itself overly reliant on the US for protection should tensions escalate in the Indo-Pacific.

In recent years, Prime Minister Scott Morrison has moved to embrace the US more closely as a security partner, building a personal relationship with former President Donald Trump and attempting to do with same with his successor.

At the same time, relations between Canberra and Beijing have been slowly unraveling, a spiral which only worsened after the start of the Covid-19 pandemic amid questions over the virus's origins.

On Thursday, China reacted angrily to the new security deal with Foreign Ministry spokesperson Zhao Lijan saying the blame for deteriorating relations "rests entirely with the Australian side."

Yun Jiang, editor of the China Neican newsletter and researcher at the Australian National University, said the deal was the "final nail in the coffin" of Australia's relationship with China, effectively eliminating any chance for rapprochement, at least in the short term.

"Until there is a new equilibrium in the international balance of power, I think the relationship is going to be tense," she said...

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2844 on: September 17, 2021, 06:32:47 PM »
Beijing rhetoric be like, stop hitting yourselves with our fists of fury that will surely fall in a blinding light of justice and rightitude..


Sorry France. EU never saved nobody.

Re: What's in the News
« Reply #2845 on: September 17, 2021, 11:52:02 PM »
The thing about AU turning toward US, that's a bit embarrassing, right? Because like, US exiting Iraq and Afghanistan, that's a sign of US weakness, right? US is failing, right?

Resources freed up, attention less divided, Asia coming into focus....


What I thought, way back in 2001, one Tuesday night in September, sitting in a poky Chinese apartment watching CNN, was we were all fucked. Because the Americans were going to come out into the world and everything was going to get messy.



I have no conclusion